The Customer-Focused Utility

THE CHANGING DYNAMICS OF CUSTOMER RELATIONSHIPS

The utilities industry is in transition. External factors – including shifts in governmental policies, a globally felt sense of urgency about conserving energy, advances in power generation techniques and new technologies – are driving massive changes throughout the industry. Utilities are also under internal pressure to prevent profit margins from eroding. But most significantly, utilities must evolve to compete in a marketplace where consumers increasingly expect high-quality customer service and believe that no company deserves their unconditional loyalty if it cannot perform to expectations. These pressures are putting many utility providers into seriously competitive, market-driven situations where the customer experience becomes a primary differentiator.

In the past, utility companies had very limited interactions with customers. Apart from opening new accounts and billing for services, the relationship was remote, with customers giving no more thought to their power provider than they would to finding a post office. Consumers were indifferent to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and essentially took a passive view of all utility functions, only contacting the utility if their lights temporarily went out.

In contrast, the utility of the future can expect a much more intense level of customer involvement. If utilities embrace programs to change customers’ behaviors – for example, by implementing time-of-use rates – customers will need more information on a timelier basis in order to make educated decisions. In addition, customers will expect higher levels of service to keep up with changes in the rest of the commercial world. As consumers get used to checking their bank account and credit card balances via mobile devices, they’ll soon expect the same from all similar services, including their utility company. As younger consumers (Generation Y and now Generation Z) begin their relationships with utilities, they bring expectations of a digital, mobile and collaborative customer service experience. Taking a broader perspective, most age segments – even baby boomers – will begin demanding these new multichannel experiences at times that are convenient for them.

The most significant industry shifts will alter the level of interaction between the utility grid and the home. In the past, this was a one-way street; in the future, however, more households will be adopting “participatory generation” due to their increased use of renewable energy. This will require a more sophisticated home/ grid relationship, in order to track the give and take of power between consumers as both users and generators. This shift will likely change the margin equation for most utility companies.

Customer Demands Drive Technology Change; Technology Change Drives Customer Demand

Utilities are addressing these and other challenges by implementing new business models that are supported by new technologies. The most visible – and arguably the most important – of the new technologies are advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) and the technical components of the smart grid, which integrates AMI with distribution automation and other technologies to connect a utility’s equipment, devices, systems, customers, partners and employees. The integration of these technologies with customer information systems (CIS) and other customer relationship management (CRM) tools will increase consumer control of energy expenditures. Most companies in the industry will need to shift away from the “ratepayer” approach they currently use to serve residential and small business customers, and adapt to changing consumer behavior and emerging business models enabled by new network and generation technologies.

Impacts on the Customer Experience

There are multiple paths to smart grid deployment, all of which utility firms have employed to leverage new sources of data on power demand. If we consider a gradual transformation from today’s centralized, one-way view to a network that is both distributed and dynamic, we can begin to project how technological shifts will impact the utility-consumer relationship, as illustrated in Figure 1.

The future industry value chain for grid-connected customers will have the same physical elements and flow as the current one but be able to provide many more information-oriented elements. Consequently, the shift to a customer-focused view will have serious implications for data management. These include a proliferation of data as well as new mandates for securely tracking, updating, accessing, analyzing and ensuring quality.

In addition, utilities must develop customer experience capabilities in parallel with extending their energy information management capabilities. Taking the smart grid path requires customers to be more involved, as decision-making responsibility shifts more toward the consumer, as depicted in Figure 2.

It’s also important to consider some of the new interactions that consumers will have with their utility company. Some of these will be viewed as “features” of the new technology, whereas others may significantly change how consumers view their relationship with their energy provider. Still others will have a profound impact on how data is captured and deployed within the organization. These interactions may include:

  • Highly detailed, timely and accurate individuated customer information;
  • Interaction between the utility and smart devices – including the meter – in the home (possibly based on customers’ preferences);
  • Seamless, bidirectional, individual communication permitting an extended dialogue across multiple channels such as short message service, integrated voice response, portals and customer care;
  • Rapid (real-time) analysis of prior usage, current usage and prediction of future usage under multiple usage and tariff models;
  • Information presented in a customer-friendly manner;
  • Analytical tools that enable customers to model their consumption behavior and understand the impact of changes on energy cost and carbon footprint;
  • Ability to access and integrate a wide range of external information sources, and present pertinent selections to a customer;
  • Integration of information flow from field operations to the customer call center infrastructure; and
  • Highly skilled, knowledgeable contact center agents who can not only provide accurate information but can advise and recommend products, services, rate plans or changes in consumption profiles.

Do We Need to Begin Thinking About Customers Differently?

Two primary factors will determine the nature of the interface between utilities and consumers in the future. The first is the degree to which consumers will take the initiative in making decisions about the energy supply and their own energy consumption. Second, the amount and percentage of consumers’ disposable income that they allocate to energy will directly influence their consumption and conservation choices, as shown in Figure 3.

How Do Utilities Influence Customers’ Behavior?

One of the major benefits of involving energy customers in generation and consumption decisions is that it can serve to decrease base load. Traditionally, utilities have taken two basic approaches to accomplishing this: coercion and enticement. Coercion is a penalty-based approach for inducing a desired behavior. For example, utilities may charge higher rates for peak period usage, forcing customers to change the hours when they consume power or pay more for peak period usage. The risks of this approach include increased customer dissatisfaction and negative public and regulatory opinion.

Enticement, on the other hand, is an incentive-based approach for driving a desired behavior. For example, utilities could offer cost savings to customers who shift power consumption to off-peak times. The risks associated with this approach include low customer involvement, because incentives may not be enough to overcome the inconvenience to customers.

Both of these approaches have produced results in the past, but neither will necessarily work in the new, more interactive environment. A number of other strategies may prove more effective in the future. For example, customer goal achievement may be one way to generate positive behavior. This model offers benefits to customers by making it easier for them to achieve their own energy consumption or conservation goals. It also gives customers the feeling that they have choices – which promotes a more positive relationship between the customer and the utility. Ease of use represents another factor that influences customer behavior. Companies can accomplish this by creating programs and interfaces that make it simple for the customer to analyze information and make decisions.

There is no “silver bullet” approach to successfully influencing all customers in all utility environments. Often, each customer segment must be treated differently, and each utility company will need to develop a unique customer experience strategy and plan that fits the needs of its unique business situation. The variables will include macro factors such as geography, customer econo-graphics and energy usage patterns; however, they’ll also involve more nuanced attributes such as customer service experiences, customer advocacy attitudes and their individual emotional dispositions.

CONCLUSION

Most utilities considering implementing advanced metering or broader smart grid efforts focus almost exclusively on deploying new technologies. However, they also need to consider customer behavior. Utilities must adopt a new approach that expands the scope of their strategic road map by integrating the “voice of the customer” into the technology planning and deployment process.

By carefully examining a utility customer’s expectations and anticipating the customer impacts brought on by innovative technologies, smart utility companies can get ahead of the customer experience curve, drive more value to the bottom line and ultimately become truly customer focused.

The Utility of the Future

The utility industry is in transition. Changing customer needs and expectations are redefining how utilities understand, plan and execute superior customer experiences. In addition, new technologies are enabling new ways to interact with customers.

What will the utility of the future look like? How will customers view their increasing dependency on energy in light of rising energy bills and a sense of urgency to conserve? Do utilities need to start thinking about customers differently? Given the shift in consumer attitudes, along with the rapid advancement of new technologies, what will the industry look like in three, five or even 10 years? While we don’t have a crystal ball to provide all of the answers, IBM has invested in research teams and conducted global surveys to shed light on what the future may hold.

MAJOR CHANGES UNDERWAY

Through interviews with more than 1,000 business and public sector leaders worldwide, the IBM Global CEO Study 200 provides new and compelling perspectives on the strategic issues that are facing organizations of all sizes. Our study finds that 3 percent of CEOs see substantial change coming in the next three years. For utilities, the most dramatic change will be a greater level of customer involvement. Across all industries, CEOs will be increasing their investment in today’s more informed and collaboration-focused customers. As younger consumers begin their relationships with utilities, they bring with them expectations of a digital, mobile and collaborative customer service experience. Most age segments – even boomers – will begin demanding these new multichannel experiences at times that are convenient for them. The utility of the future will have a deep collaborative relationship with the customer and offer innovations that make both its customers and its business more successful.

THE UTILITY BUSINESS MODEL OF THE FUTURE

In the past, utility companies had very limited interaction with customers beyond opening new accounts and billing for services. Consumers took a passive view of all utility activity, only raising their voices when their lights went out. The future shows a much more intense level of customer involvement. Successful companies will continuously differentiate themselves by delivering value with revenue-generating services. The utility of the future will understand the types of capabilities and services that customers will want and can identify and carefully define the gaps in current processes and systems that must be filled to meet these needs.

THE CUSTOMER-FOCUSED UTILITY

Getting perspectives from CEOs and other executives represents only one step toward understanding the utility of the future. IBM also wanted to know what utility customers were thinking. IBM surveyed 1,900 consumers from six countries and included residential households along with small commercial customers. Based on the insights from this survey, we anticipate a steady progression toward a Participatory Network, a technology ecosystem comprising a wide variety of intelligent network-connected devices, distributed generation and consumer energy management tools.

Although the precise time frame for reaching this end state is unknown, our research suggests a few major milestones. Within five years, the percentage of the world’s electric utilities that will be generating at least 10 percent of their power from renewable sources will double. In that same time frame, we believe sufficient supplier choice will allow meaningful consumer switching to emerge in most major competitive markets. We also expect utility demand management initiatives to expand dramatically and electric power generation by consumers to make tremendous inroads within 10 years.

The utility industry is fast approaching a tipping point beyond which consumers can, and increasingly will, demand equal footing with their providers. As consumer passivity gives way to active participation, utilities will have significant opportunities to differentiate themselves and help redefine the industry. Those utilities that are fully prepared to share responsibility with their customers and help them meet their specific energy goals will have a significant competitive advantage and lead the way toward the utility of the future.

INNOVATING FOR THE FUTURE

The utility industry’s future lies in a more participatory structure, where consumers can choose to be actively engaged, and information is abundant and free-fl owing. To thrive in this environment, utilities must be prepared to harness real-time usage information, use it to gain insights into a much more complex consumer base and match products and services to each customer group. Advances in sensor, switching and communications technologies are enabling the next-generation utility. The resulting Intelligent Utility Network will provide a new world of grid monitoring and control and increased options for utility customers.

IBM has proven results in delivering Intelligent Utility Network infrastructures that provide superior reliability and end-to-end network data in near real time. We bring to the table the integration skills, leading-edge technology and partner ecosystem required to support every stage of an Intelligent Utility Network initiative.

As a result of extensive engagements around the world, we have gained deep experience and understand the business processes and technical architecture required for an effective Intelligent Utility Network implementation. We bring together the relevant tools, methodologies, resources and people experienced in the Energy and Utilities industry.

WHY IBM?

IBM delivers innovation that matters for our clients. As a global enterprise, we value innovation that matters for our company and for the world. IBM’s corporate citizenship reflects both our brand and our values by addressing some of society’s most complex problems with game-changing business and technology innovation.

WHY WE ARE UNIQUELY QUALIFIED

The following represent just some of the reasons IBM is uniquely qualified to serve the utility industry:

We Know the Energy and Utilities Business

We help clients define their core competitive advantages. And we do this better than anyone else because we bring deep industry and functional expertise, global experience, high-powered research and a unique understanding of how utilities succeed when they fully leverage technology to their advantage. We bring the following unmatched assets:

  • 70,000 business and industry consultants;
  • On-demand innovation services;
  • Component business modeling;
  • Business Transformation Outsourcing
  • Center for Business Optimization; and
  • Institute for Business Value.

We Know Integration and Transformation

IBM can help energy and utility clients realize the full value of innovation by integrating technology into the fabric of their business, creating the competitive advantage that’s right for them. We offer:

  • Business Performance Transformation Services;
  • Engineering and Technology Services;
  • Application Innovation Services;
  • Custom Logic Capability; and
  • Leadership in Open Standards.

We Know Technology

We are the technology leader. Even more importantly, we know how to deploy all of our technology products and services to deliver the flexible IT infrastructure required to transform businesses and take advantage of every dimension of innovation. We can deploy:

  • 170,000 technology experts;
  • On-demand portfolio/capabilities;
  • Service-oriented architectures and Web services;
  • Modular, scalable and secure computing environments based on open standards;
  • Linux solutions;
  • Middle-ware industry solutions; and
  • Infrastructure management

IBM and the environment

IBM is committed to environmental leadership in all of its business activities, from its operations to the design of its products and use of its technology.