Mining for Keywords

Now that you’ve set up your search engine marketing campaign and it’s chugging along nicely, how do you take things to the next level? You’ve picked out some good keywords, written some good copy and you’re getting a reasonable ROI, but every time you look at your pay-per-click campaigns, you just know there’s more that you could be doing to maximize your investment. And you know what? You’re right.

The next step is to start prospecting for keywords that are lower in price but still bring good results. Anyone can set up a keyword campaign with all the obvious keywords and spend a bunch of money. Smart marketers know, however, that one of the best ways to beat their competition is to go after those keywords that the competition hasn’t discovered yet. More than 500 million keywords are searched every month on the major search engines, yet only 15 to 20 percent of those keywords have bids. A veritable gold rush of keywords is just waiting to happen.

Admittedly those keywords will have lower volumes of search than all of the one-word and two-word options you are currently bidding on, but the conversion rates will be higher, and by spreading your budget over a larger number of words, you minimize your monetary risk.

The Mining Process

You’ll want to utilize two methods in the mining process. One involves brainstorming, the other research, but good keyword development strategies take advantage of both.

For the first, find yourself a big blank wall and a stack of sticky notes. You’re going to use this wall to start the brainstorming process, but don’t do this alone or, even worse, with your marketing team. You are too close to your website to be objective. You’ve watched its growth and development since it was nothing more than a twinkle in the designer’s eye, and although you may try to think like your customer, nine times out of 10 you will fail to consider all the different ways someone might search for your product or service.

People search in very random ways. Most of them don’t know all the buzzwords, jargon and abbreviations associated with your business, so they don’t use them. Your marketing team may be in the habit of trying to influence your customers to behave in certain ways on your site. Many marketing teams are great at this, but their influence doesn’t extend to the way people are accustomed to searching. They are going to search their way no matter what you think, so your job is to figure out their thought process and put your website in front of them.

The best thing you can do is conduct your own informal focus group. Gather a bunch of your friends, associates, relatives and others, and sit them down in front of that blank wall. Feed them (if that’s the only way you can get them), but try to get folks who know little or nothing about your business. Tell them, “I sell widgets. If you were looking for widgets online, what would you enter into a search engine?” Then get ready to write each keyword on a sticky note as fast as you can. The reason you will want to use sticky notes is that once you have all the keywords written down, it is easy to move them around to create “buckets.” These buckets usually correspond to specific products, price and volume. Once you have those buckets, you can easily set up your categories in Yahoo and your Adgroups in Google. Having these buckets established will also allow you to write relevant titles and descriptions for each, thus minimizing the amount of time spent copywriting.

The second step in the keyword mining process involves using tools to dig for more variations on your keyword bucket themes. You can take all the words your focus group has suggested and use them to expand your lists by plugging them into such keyword research tools as:

  • Yahoo Keyword Selector Tool (searchmarketing.yahoo.com/rc/srch)
  • Google AdWords Keyword Tool (ad words.google.com/select/)
  • KeywordSandbox (https://adwords.google.com/select/ KeywordSandbox)
  • Wordtracker (www.wordtracker.com)
  • KeywordMax (www.keywordmax.com)
  • Keyword Intelligence (www.keyword intelligence.com)

Taking It to the Next Level

While brainstorming and research are crucial to the keyword prospecting process, they are much more effective when combined with other techniques. Take advantage of all the tools and advice available to make your site a veritable gold mine. Here are some time-tested ideas that have worked for me.

Add an internal search engine to your site. This will give you tons of information on how users are finding you. It will also let you know whether users are finding what they want when they get to your site. A good search engine tool can be found at www.freefind.com, or you can find many others by typing “open source search engine” into any search engine. You will want one that just searches your site rather than searching the whole Web, as you obviously don’t want to encourage users to leave your site as soon as they get there.

Check out the source code on your competitors’ sites. You may be able to get ideas for your brainstorming process from some of the keywords they are focusing on. Remember, it’s not a good idea to use the same keywords unless you offer the same product or service, but it’s a good place to start looking for ideas.

Consider your entire website. Many folks stop their keyword research on their home page. They don’t know that their internal pages can provide a wealth of new keywords to attack.

Look for all related words. Make sure you include all variations of a term. Choose words that are singular, plural, misspellings, abbreviations, etc.

As you mine, remember that a “keyword” is not just one or two words. Many keywords are now three, four, five or more words in length – these are the keywords that are producing higher ROI with less investment.

Internet users are becoming more sophisticated in how they search and are utilizing longer keyword phrases to find what they need. Marketers, fortunately for you, aren’t keeping pace with this trend, and that’s what’s driving the prices so high on the one-word and two-word search terms. By thinking a little more creatively, and pursuing more of those niche terms, you can compete very effectively against the big keyword mining companies. After all, a little bit of gold from a lot of rocks is worth just as much as one big nugget. You may have to work harder to get it, but in the end, a gold baron is a gold baron, regardless of how he made his wealth.

MARY O’BRIEN is a partner at Telic Media. She was formerly senior director of sales at Yahoo Search Marketing and is currently presenting their advertiser workshops around the country.

Entrepreneur Sees the Light

While reviewing newbie sites, my heart sinks as I see the world’s zillionth “How to Start a Successful Online Business” site. The aspiring netpreneur, whom I’ll call Bob, has obviously sweat great drops of blood to build his first site, yet he hasn’t seen a dime of revenue.

If only I could talk to him…

“So, what made you choose Internet and affiliate marketing as the topic for your first site, Bob?”

“Well, there are piles of money to be made promoting Internet business info products and software because everyone wants to start an online business and make money on the Internet,” he explains.

I agree that it certainly seems that way, then give him some hard data. Overture’s Keyword Selector Tool shows that “Internet marketing” was queried approximately 250,000 times last month. “Make money online” had just over 67,000 searches. In demand terms, that’s a workable market. To see if it can work for Bob, I ask him some questions about his site. “I see you’re promoting XSitePro and Article Announcer. What do you think of them?”

Bob replies, “Oh, I haven’t bought either. I used a free HTML editor and I use other people’s articles on my site.”

Although I know he doesn’t use an autoresponder service either, because there’s no subscriber signup form on his site, I ask how he likes ABC’s autoresponder service.

Bob tells me that he doesn’t plan to build a list because he’s not into the hassle of putting together an e-course or writing a regular newsletter. His no-knowledge, no-experience responses are consistent until I ask for his thoughts about the Internet/affiliate marketing courses prominently advertised on his home page.

He says they’re great and rattles off the list of Internet and affiliate marketing tutorials and software products he’s bought over the last few months. “Insider’s Secrets was the very first product I bought online, then John Reese’s, Corey Rudl’s, Jim Edwards’, yours and-and-and… .”

I do some quick math and estimate he’s already invested a couple thousand dollars in tutorials and software. I tell Bob that those are excellent resources to be able to refer to in his Internet business library.

“Can you tell me what persuaded you to invest in John’s course?” I ask Bob. “Was it his sales copy, or did you get a recommendation from someone who bought it?”

“I’m not really sure where I learned about it first,” Bob says. He thinks he may have seen an ad for it on Google, but he’s on a lot of different lists, including some of John’s affiliates’ lists, so he may have gotten an email from a couple of them. Bob says he read about the course on John’s site, then posted questions in some of the affiliate marketing forums to find out if anyone really bought the course and whether it worked for them. Bob was convinced to buy John’s course based on the testimonials on the site. He appreciated seeing proof of how well John’s techniques work by showing screenshots of the results some people had after using his system. “There were even links to those sites,” Bob explains.

“Well done,” I say. Like most Internet shoppers, Bob did his due diligence and ended up buying a good product.

“You’ve probably noticed that John Reese’s affiliates continue to recommend Traffic Secrets to their newsletter subscribers,” I explain. The most successful affiliates keep testing John’s techniques and tracking traffic. They broadcast good results to their list and mention that they learned those techniques from the Traffic Secrets course, which they then link to in their message. That’s a stellar example of how the top affiliate marketers work. They find a product they can stand behind and then recommend it to their subscribers, who are interested in products of that type.

Bob remains quiet, so I continue. “The process works exceptionally well when your subscribers know that you aren’t the merchant, but rather an unbiased reviewer who gives them the straight goods.” When you consistently make excellent product recommendations, I tell Bob, both your credibility and income will skyrocket. Unfortunately, a balanced review is pretty hard to write when you haven’t tested a product, and building credibility within a niche is virtually impossible if you aren’t building a list.

I am met with complete silence from my new friend Bob.

I ask, “Did you know that each of the Internet marketing experts you mentioned started online in markets that had nothing to do with Internet marketing products?” John Reese became an eBay expert, Corey Rudl sold car decals, Jim Edwards was into real estate and the single crowd is still my primary market. All of us learned how to market online in businesses related to one of our passionate interests or hobbies.

“When you’re really keen on a topic, it’s easy and fun to share what you know with a group of like-minded individuals – your subscribers,” I tell Bob. “They listen to you, come to like you and then they’ll buy from you. Better yet, passion for your topic will keep you going on those days when you feel like you’re drowning in a sea of cut-and-paste affiliate links or promotional emails from your merchants.”

I ask Bob what he’s passionate about and discover that he lives and breathes martial arts. With Overture’s Keyword Suggestion Tool open, I am able to quickly tell him that there were 241,000 searches for “martial arts” last month. That’s almost the same number as for “Internet marketing,” and we haven’t even begun to look at the permutations. There are martial arts product suppliers with affiliate programs, some with commissions as high as 30 percent. To make the site lucrative, however, Bob will have to build a subscriber list.

“Do you think you could write a regular newsletter about martial arts?” I query.

“For sure,” Bob replies.

“Perfect. And you can keep using your current domain, BlackBeltBobs.com.”

“Awesome!”

“It must be destiny, Bob,” I say. “The only suggestion I’ll make is that you may want to reconsider your royal blue, olive and burgundy color scheme. Check out ColorSchemer.com for some good combinations.”

“Hey, thanks for the great tip, Ros.”

“My pleasure, Bob.”

ROSALIND GARDNER is the author of the best-selling guide to affiliate marketing, The Super Affiliate Handbook: How I Made $436,797 in One Year Selling Other People’s Stuff Online. It is available on Amazon and www.SuperAffiliateHandbook.com.

A Brand New Day for BrandNewDad.com

Not every website sells widgets. But that doesn’t mean every website doesn’t need an effective home page.

In this column, we chose an information portal as our subject. So instead of addressing questions like what the site is selling, and how to make a purchase, our focus was on the proper display of content, use of colors and communicating the benefits of registration.

Our subject is BrandNewDad.com. The site has a wealth of information for fathers, with helpful feature articles, pregnancy information, forums, a shopping directory and various other valuable resources. Unfortunately, the owner succumbed to the common temptation to jam-pack the home page with more options than the eye can bear. The result is a cluttered, confusing, jumbled mess.

As BrandNewDad.com owner Dave Trenck put it, “The site is too busy. ” I’d like to be able to highlight the community aspects of the site, the personalization features and, of course, intertwine all the various affiliate links and support the various CPM and CPC ad placements.”

The goal of this redesign – just as with OriginalDogBiscuit.com (the online purveyor of doggie treats we featured in the last issue) – is to increase conversions. Ultimately, that’s what it is all about.

That’s why I’ve coined the term “Conversion Design” to describe the business of design. You’ll be hearing much more about this concept as the year unfolds because it encompasses critical Web design elements that spark increased conversions, like color theory, usability and copywriting.

How do you increase conversions on a site that does not peddle products? Conversion Design is not always about direct sales. Sometimes it’s about indirect sales, or even qualified sales leads. Trenck’s goal, for example, is to woo site registrants so that in addition to serving up personalized content, he can display targeted ads that convert at higher percentages than their untargeted counterparts. In this case, registrants are considered conversions.

Our task was to redesign the home page to make the site’s benefits crystal clear. At the same time, the home page would need to soft-sell the advantages of free registration. The end result would be more registered users, more repeat visitors and more ad revenue for BrandNewDad.com. That’s good news for Trenck, but we’ve got to wade through the bad news to get there.

When we showed the original site to our small yet highly critical focus group, phrases like “too wordy,” “too much info,” “unclear navigation” and “no main point of interest” echoed through the meeting. Vincent Flanders, author of Web Pages That Suck: Learn Good Design by Looking at Bad Design, probably would have agreed. He lists having too much material on one page as one of his top 10 Web design mistakes. According to Flanders, “With so much content vying for attention, it’s initially impossible for the eye to settle on one thing. People get confused and people leave.”

BEFORE

Sostre & Associates’ art director Jason Graham has a slightly different take on the issue of displaying too much content: “A good site should lead me or suggest to me what content I might find useful. The biggest problem with BrandNewDad.com is that even though things are categorized, it doesn’t feel like they are.”

Graham’s guiding concept for our approach: Group the content into clearly defined categories so visitors can easily move through the page. This is referred to in the design industry as “chunking.”

AFTER

“The idea is to categorize and then visually group information, as opposed to letting it all bleed together,” Graham says. “We can do that by adding more white space between the elements and making the headlines or titles larger. Chunking helps to make the page scannable so we can still include all the same information that the website currently has, but now it’s easy to understand.”

Besides better content organization, we took three additional steps in our quest to make the home page more user-friendly: reducing the navigational elements, decreasing the number of colors and increasing the white space.

Like other sites with loads of content, BrandNewDad.com wants users to see it all. That’s why the site has so many options in its main navigation. In our experience, however, having too many navigation buttons can overwhelm visitors. So we reduced the number of buttons to five and repositioned the missing navigation items.

Next up: colors. The site uses six colors throughout the various user-interface elements. This mishmash spectrum contributes to the busy, uncomfortable feeling our focus group verbalized. We cut this number in half and allowed a three-color scheme to help unify the design.

White space can be tricky. On one hand, if we overdo it, we waste space that could be displaying information. On the other hand, if we don’t have enough white space, we end up with a cluttered mess. In this case, we definitely needed to increase white space to achieve the “chunking” Graham mentioned.

Our redesign simplified the site without sacrificing important information, making it easier for new visitors to understand the site’s benefits. Once the visitors are sold on the site, enticing them to register and personalize their experience is much more likely. We can encourage registration by highlighting personalization features and positioning the “register” and “sign in” links in standard locations.

We’ve taken the important first steps of giving this home page a much-needed overhaul. But the work should not stop there. An essential aspect of Conversion Design is continuous testing and review. Websites should be reviewed and tweaked frequently to ensure that their creators are getting the best possible outcome. User feedback and a careful eye for conversion rates should be the guiding factors in this process.

Would you like to get a free home page or landing page design for your website and see it featured in this column? To be considered, please send your name, company, contact information (phone, email, etc.), a brief description of your business and its goals, and, of course, your URL to bydesign@sostreassoc.com. Please put “Revenue’s By Design Makeover” in the subject header.

PEDRO SOSTRE is principal and creative director at Sostre & Associates, a consulting and development firm, which also promotes affiliate programs. Pedro is currently working on a book about his new concept of Conversion Design, scheduled for release this summer.

Winning the Seasonal Race

Managing a seasonal program is akin to drag racing – lots of hard work goes into the preparation, the light turns green, then it’s over.

For a seasonal program to be successful, it’s crucial for its managers to think like affiliates. If you were a top affiliate looking for a program, where would you go and what would you want to hear? If you can get into the head of an affiliate, you can gain the perspective of a top performer, understand the tools necessary for success and learn how to win.

Attracting Valuable Affiliates

All of your affiliates are valuable, but the top performers will give you the highest return on investment. Forget the 80/20 rule (80 percent of revenue comes from 20 percent of affiliates). In 2005, for example, only 1 percent of TaxBrain.com’s affiliates generated 80 percent of affiliate revenue. Obviously some affiliates were better prepared before the season began. They most likely used the following steps to success.

Find the best program. Check out resources such as search engines, affiliate networks, directories, forums, events and other networking opportunities. Within these, look for the most compelling stories on potential earnings in terms of conversion rates, clicks per sale and commission structures.

Use the right keywords. Your program’s online presence begins by building affiliate pages optimized for keywords in your niche. Online marketing success means ranking high in the search results for your particular niche (such as "tax affiliate program"). Searching on Google for "affiliate program" yields 134 million organic results as opposed to 74 million for "top affiliate program." Paid search has a decent ROI, but you can also achieve meaningful results by site-targeting popular affiliate and webmaster hangouts, as well as home businesses and small-business portals.

Spread the word. Take advantage of communication opportunities available through your affiliate network. These include multiple category listings, newsletters, conferences and email marketing. Top-performing seasonal programs are often overlooked by the Big 3 affiliate networks (Commission Junction, LinkShare and Performics). This is because their indicators are heavily weighted with off-season trends. To overcome this, capture your performance results when it’s your time of the year and trumpet that information all year long.

Get listed. Affiliate directories work well, so get listed in as many as possible and pay those that are worthwhile. Often, reciprocating links are all you need to offer. To attract the best performers, talk payouts, highlight impressive stats or try catchy headlines like "Top Affiliate Earned Enough Last Season to Take Rest of Year Off!" Most directories don’t offer much listing space, so make your sales pitch count.

Use the forums. Forums are a beautiful thing – think of them as the eBay feedback mechanism of affiliate marketing. They allow you to monitor affiliate concerns and provide an excellent opportunity to market your program. Buzz around the forums, abide by the rules, post when appropriate and be sure that your signature promotes your affiliate program.

Make it personal. Personal relationships with affiliates often begin at trade shows and other industry networking events through direct contact. When online, you can gather contact information by using freebies and give-aways as motivation. For example, offer T-shirts or publications in exchange for direct contact information.

Optimizing Your Program

With thousands of seasonal programs all claiming to be the best and attempting to clear obstacles such as being overlooked by network indicators, it’s imperative that awareness of your program rises above the noise. For a seasonal program to be a winner, it must be well-tuned. To achieve maximum performance, managers can use the following ideas:

  1. Evaluate all existing affiliate communications from sign-up to acceptance. Review and revise your program listing to sell the opportunity, not just the product. Adjust your welcome letter and carefully craft your first message so they are appealing.
  2. Review competition in and out of your own network. Sign up as an affiliate and join your competition’s programs. Examine messaging and compensation within those programs for strengths and weakness. Implement strategies to exploit the weaknesses of your competition. Use the information to increase the appeal of your program while reducing your competition.
  3. Determine the lifetime value of a customer and create the highest commission structure in your niche. Pay more and pay faster. Pay your best affiliates the most. Provide additional strategic information and offer customization. PPC players don’t have much time to test a seasonal program, so you can accelerate their acceptance and understanding by releasing specific ROI stats from your own PPC performance.
  4. Create program offers that are appropriate for differing business models. Loyalty, incentive, shopping and content sites may have different needs than those of email marketers. To help accelerate sales during the season, create tiered offers that reward affiliates with additional commissions when well-defined revenue targets are achieved. Be sure your reward structure is attainable and measurable.
  5. Assess and build compelling creative. Ensure that initial messaging and associated landing pages match for consistency. Eliminate extra clicks or distractions at registration and preserve the initial click through messaging throughout the experience to checkout.

With your engine tuned for best performance, it’s time to put team dynamics into play.

School Your Affiliates

Once you have affiliates, you must teach these new business partners how to sell your product effectively. They have the ability to generate traffic, but you have to show them how to deliver it for maximum conversion. Here are some helpful tips to get the job done.

Organize your approach into complete campaigns – define targets, duration and exact message, using your affiliate Web pages for emphasis. Produce a matching keyword list. Promote each campaign individually.

Separate affiliates into meaningful groups to quickly spot trends. Create "watch" groups so you can track performance and monitor activity. Consider grouping by like business models or by special promotion. Continue to reorganize and regroup as business conditions change.

Communicate specific selling opportunities and develop a messaging strategy around each campaign. Start a blog enabled with RSS, in lieu of an emailed newsletter, to keep affiliates informed. Give your affiliates sufficient notice to put a new campaign into play (some need up to a month’s lead time).

Motivate your affiliates. Contests make things fun, but more importantly they help keep your program top of mind all season. For maximum exposure, create a contest that anyone can win. Have a daily prize throughout the selling season.

Try to identify demographic shifts or new trends that might be happening, then communicate this new information quickly. As an example, Hurricane Katrina created new government initiatives that benefit survivors, which could affect the way consumers search for tax products. This made new keyword combinations such as "hurricane tax," "katrina tax relief" and "hurricane katrina tax forms" valuable.

When managing a seasonal affiliate program, remember it’s the off-season that’s critical to next year’s success. That’s when you should learn from the experience, evaluate performance, incorporate new technologies and make all necessary changes. Recruit, optimize and communicate – these are the keys for managing a topperforming seasonal program.

 

TODD TAYLOR manages business development for TaxBrain.com from Petz Enterprises in Tracy, Calif. He is a technology veteran and entrepreneur with more than 20 years in the industry. He studied economics at Carleton University and is a graduate of computing from St. Lawrence College.

Managing a seasonal program is akin to drag racing – lots of hard work goes into the preparation, the light turns green, then it’s over.

For a seasonal program to be successful, it’s crucial for its managers to think like affiliates. If you were a top affiliate looking for a program, where would you go and what would you want to hear? If you can get into the head of an affiliate, you can gain the perspective of a top performer, understand the tools necessary for success and learn how to win.

Attracting Valuable Affiliates

All of your affiliates are valuable, but the top performers will give you the highest return on investment. Forget the 80/20 rule (80 percent of revenue comes from 20 percent of affiliates). In 2005, for example, only 1 percent of TaxBrain.com’s affiliates generated 80 percent of affiliate revenue. Obviously some affiliates were better prepared before the season began. They most likely used the following steps to success.

Find the best program. Check out resources such as search engines, affiliate networks, directories, forums, events and other networking opportunities. Within these, look for the most compelling stories on potential earnings in terms of conversion rates, clicks per sale and commission structures.

Use the right keywords. Your program’s online presence begins by building affiliate pages optimized for keywords in your niche. Online marketing success means ranking high in the search results for your particular niche (such as "tax affiliate program"). Searching on Google for "affiliate program" yields 134 million organic results as opposed to 74 million for "top affiliate program." Paid search has a decent ROI, but you can also achieve meaningful results by site-targeting popular affiliate and webmaster hangouts, as well as home businesses and small-business portals.

Spread the word. Take advantage of communication opportunities available through your affiliate network. These include multiple category listings, newsletters, conferences and email marketing. Top-performing seasonal programs are often overlooked by the Big 3 affiliate networks (Commission Junction, LinkShare and Performics). This is because their indicators are heavily weighted with off-season trends. To overcome this, capture your performance results when it’s your time of the year and trumpet that information all year long.

Get listed. Affiliate directories work well, so get listed in as many as possible and pay those that are worthwhile. Often, reciprocating links are all you need to offer. To attract the best performers, talk payouts, highlight impressive stats or try catchy headlines like "Top Affiliate Earned Enough Last Season to Take Rest of Year Off!" Most directories don’t offer much listing space, so make your sales pitch count.

Use the forums. Forums are a beautiful thing – think of them as the eBay feedback mechanism of affiliate marketing. They allow you to monitor affiliate concerns and provide an excellent opportunity to market your program. Buzz around the forums, abide by the rules, post when appropriate and be sure that your signature promotes your affiliate program.

Make it personal. Personal relationships with affiliates often begin at trade shows and other industry networking events through direct contact. When online, you can gather contact information by using freebies and give-aways as motivation. For example, offer T-shirts or publications in exchange for direct contact information.

Optimizing Your Program

With thousands of seasonal programs all claiming to be the best and attempting to clear obstacles such as being overlooked by network indicators, it’s imperative that awareness of your program rises above the noise. For a seasonal program to be a winner, it must be well-tuned. To achieve maximum performance, managers can use the following ideas:

  1. Evaluate all existing affiliate communications from sign-up to acceptance. Review and revise your program listing to sell the opportunity, not just the product. Adjust your welcome letter and carefully craft your first message so they are appealing.
  2. Review competition in and out of your own network. Sign up as an affiliate and join your competition’s programs. Examine messaging and compensation within those programs for strengths and weakness. Implement strategies to exploit the weaknesses of your competition. Use the information to increase the appeal of your program while reducing your competition.
  3. Determine the lifetime value of a customer and create the highest commission structure in your niche. Pay more and pay faster. Pay your best affiliates the most. Provide additional strategic information and offer customization. PPC players don’t have much time to test a seasonal program, so you can accelerate their acceptance and understanding by releasing specific ROI stats from your own PPC performance.
  4. Create program offers that are appropriate for differing business models. Loyalty, incentive, shopping and content sites may have different needs than those of email marketers. To help accelerate sales during the season, create tiered offers that reward affiliates with additional commissions when well-defined revenue targets are achieved. Be sure your reward structure is attainable and measurable.
  5. Assess and build compelling creative. Ensure that initial messaging and associated landing pages match for consistency. Eliminate extra clicks or distractions at registration and preserve the initial click through messaging throughout the experience to checkout.

With your engine tuned for best performance, it’s time to put team dynamics into play.

School Your Affiliates

Once you have affiliates, you must teach these new business partners how to sell your product effectively. They have the ability to generate traffic, but you have to show them how to deliver it for maximum conversion. Here are some helpful tips to get the job done.

Organize your approach into complete campaigns – define targets, duration and exact message, using your affiliate Web pages for emphasis. Produce a matching keyword list. Promote each campaign individually.

Separate affiliates into meaningful groups to quickly spot trends. Create "watch" groups so you can track performance and monitor activity. Consider grouping by like business models or by special promotion. Continue to reorganize and regroup as business conditions change.

Communicate specific selling opportunities and develop a messaging strategy around each campaign. Start a blog enabled with RSS, in lieu of an emailed newsletter, to keep affiliates informed. Give your affiliates sufficient notice to put a new campaign into play (some need up to a month’s lead time).

Motivate your affiliates. Contests make things fun, but more importantly they help keep your program top of mind all season. For maximum exposure, create a contest that anyone can win. Have a daily prize throughout the selling season.

Try to identify demographic shifts or new trends that might be happening, then communicate this new information quickly. As an example, Hurricane Katrina created new government initiatives that benefit survivors, which could affect the way consumers search for tax products. This made new keyword combinations such as "hurricane tax," "katrina tax relief" and "hurricane katrina tax forms" valuable.

When managing a seasonal affiliate program, remember it’s the off-season that’s critical to next year’s success. That’s when you should learn from the experience, evaluate performance, incorporate new technologies and make all necessary changes. Recruit, optimize and communicate – these are the keys for managing a topperforming seasonal program.

 

TODD TAYLOR manages business development for TaxBrain.com from Petz Enterprises in Tracy, Calif. He is a technology veteran and entrepreneur with more than 20 years in the industry. He studied economics at Carleton University and is a graduate of computing from St. Lawrence College.

The Best Intentions

Effective self-marketing is the quickest path to success.

Whether you know it or not, you’re marketing yourself every day – to lots of people. You’re marketing yourself in a quest to make a sale, warm up a relationship, get a job, get connected, get something you deserve. You’re always sending messages about yourself.

Guerrillas control the messages that they send. It’s all about intention. Guerrillas live intentionally. Non-guerrillas send unintentional messages, even if those messages sabotage their overall goals in life. They want to close a sale for a consulting contract, but their inability to make eye contact or their confusing email message turns off the prospect.

Avoid Unintentional Messages

Unintentional messages erect an insurmountable barrier. Your job is to be sure there is no barrier. There are really two people within you – your accidental self and your intentional self. Most people are able to conduct about 95 percent of their lives by intent. But that’s not enough.

It’s the other 5 percent that can get you in trouble – or in clover. I’m not talking about phoniness here. The idea is for you to be who you are and not who you aren’t – to be aware of what you’re doing, aware of whether or not your actions communicate ideas that will help you get what you truly deserve.

Who do you market to without even realizing it? Employees. Customers. Prospects. Teachers. Parents. Children. Bosses. Prospective employers. Mates. Prospective mates. Friends. Sellers. Landlords. Neighbors. Professionals. Members of the community. The police. Service people. Family. Bankers. These people can help you or stop you from getting what you deserve. You can influence them with how you market yourself.

To market yourself properly, answer these three questions:

  1. Who are you now – if friends described you, what would they say? Be honest.
  2. What do you want out of life? Be specific for the best results.
  3. How will you know when you’ve reached your goals?

If you can’t answer these questions, you’re doomed to accidental marketing and spending your life reacting instead of responding, and the odds will be against you reaching your goals.

How do you send messages and market yourself right now? With your appearance, to be sure. You also market with your eye contact and body language, your habits, your speech patterns. You market yourself in print with your letters, email, website, notes, faxes, brochures and other printed material. You also market yourself with your attitude and ethics.

Again, you may not be aware of it, but people are constantly judging and assessing you by noticing many things. You must be sure your marketing message doesn’t conflict with your dreams. What are people using to base their opinions, to make their decisions about you? I’ve come up with more than 30 variables, but here are the top 10:

  1. Clothing
  2. Enthusiasm
  3. Neatness
  4. Tone of voice
  5. Energy level
  6. Eye contact
  7. Writing ability
  8. Spelling
  9. Business card
  10. Availability

You’re fully aware of your intentional marketing, and you invest time, energy and imagination into it, not to mention money. But you may be undermining that investment if you’re not paying attention to things that matter to others even more than what you say. These are things such as keeping promises, punctuality, honesty, demeanor, respect, gratitude, sincerity, feedback, initiative and reliability. People also notice passion – or the absence of it. They notice how well you listen to them.

How to Market Yourself

Now that you know these things, what should you do? Ben Franklin said that three of the hardest things in the world are diamonds, steel and knowing yourself. Here’s a three-step plan to get you started on the road to self-awareness and self-marketing acumen.

  1. Write a positioning statement about yourself. Identify just who you are and the positive things that stand out most about you.
  2. Identify your goals. Put into writing the three things you’d most like to achieve during the next three months, three years and 10 years.
  3. State your measuring stick. Write the details of how you will know when you’ve achieved your goals. Be brief and specific.

To guerrilla market yourself, simply be aware of and in control of the messages you send. Do so and your goals will be a lot easier to attain.

Look at your policies, procedures and daily management practices. What behaviors are you measuring and rewarding? Examine your purchasing and pricing practices – these impact your brand far more than anything you might say in your ads. Finally, look at your website through the eyes of your customers – you’ll begin to glimpse the truth of your brand.

Taking Action

Examine the soul of your company through your daily actions, not your beliefs, and you’ll soon be able to write branding ads that will ring like a bell. Behold the keys to successful brand writing:

Truth in advertising. Bad ads are filled with phrases you like to say about yourself. Good ads are filled with what your customers say about you when you’re not around. To be successful, your branding ads must sharply echo the word on the street about your company. Jeff Bezos, CEO of Amazon.com, got it right when he said, "It has always seemed to me that your brand is formed primarily not by what your company says about itself, but what the company does." You’ll discover the truth behind your brand when you can explain why customers come back.

Overstatement is passé. Offer proof to back up what you say, even if it lies only in your customers’ experience or assumptions. Branding isn’t just about the facts: People buy brands with their hearts as well as their heads. Brand loyalty is built on the fact that our purchases remind us – and tell the world around us – who we are.

Search for evocative words. Sniff out overused phrases. Stimulate customers’ minds with thoughts more interesting than the ones they were previously thinking.

Be consistent. The consistent use of the same colors and fonts is often called "branding." Your brand should remain constant in all communications from your company, including your website, email, brochures, business cards and so on.

Brands are built on consistency, the roots of which are patience and attention to detail. It’s going to take a lot longer to build your brand than you feel it should. Here’s the bottom line: If you think you’re going to be able to measure brand progress at the end of 12 short months, you’re dreaming. Brand development isn’t measured in months, but in years. Good luck with your brand.

Remember always that you are your own brand, and that if you’re not guerrilla marketing yourself, you are falling short of what you ought to be doing.

 

JAY CONRAD LEVINSON is the acknowledged father of guerrilla marketing with more than 14 million books sold in his Guerrilla Marketing series, now in 41 languages. His websites can be found at www.gmarketing.com and www.guerrillamarketingassociation.com.

Scrutiny on the Bounty

As every good bounty hunter knows, capturing your target requires exacting execution of a well-designed plan. But unlike intrepid fugitive hunters such as reality television star “Dog” Chapman, earning sizable rewards by corralling customers online doesn’t require risking life or limb.

Instead of offering commissions paid in nickels and dimes, bounty programs attract a growing number of publishers by handing out dollar rewards of tens and twenties. Programs offering substantial bounties for acquiring customers and qualified leads are now among the most lucrative opportunities for publishers. However, the increasing competition among bounty programs requires publishers to rigorously scrutinize leads and to be more aggressive in pursuing consumers.

“The biggest money in affiliate marketing is bounty programs,” says Beth Kirsch, group manager of affiliate programs at LowerMyBills.com. Kirsch, who says publishers can earn up to $75 for delivering a credit card customer, says bounties provide the greatest opportunity for rapidly increasing revenue “without going for porn or gambling.”

Companies on the hunt for consumers will pay hefty premiums “because advertisers are willing to pay up front for the lifetime value of the customer,” Kirsch says. Unlike retail sites that focus on capturing a single transaction, the companies paying bounties are looking to build an ongoing relationship with a customer. The most popular industries utilizing bounty programs include real estate, personal finance (such as credit cards and loans) and subscription services, according to Kirsch.

Kirsch says that while most bounty programs pay commissions after a transaction is completed, companies such as Netflix and Audible.com will pay out merely for getting people to sign up for free trials. “The amount of money flowing through [bounty programs] is amazing,” she says.

Leading to Search

The prospect of earning lucrative commissions is prompting companies to increase their online advertising as well as the incentives offered to attract consumers. Sites such as FreeiPods.com that are relying on search marketing to acquire new customers now make up 6 percent of total online advertising revenue, according to the Internet Advertising Bureau. During the first half of 2005, online advertising revenues for lead generation and customer acquisition rose by more than 200 percent over the prior year to $347 million.

“Paid search is a focus for customer acquisition,” says Shar VanBoskirk, a consulting analyst with Forrester Research. VanBoskirk says that search marketing is an effective tool for bounty sites in industries such as travel because it “captures a person at their point of interest.” The increased spending is raising the cost of keywords and encouraging companies to become smarter at search marketing, she says.

To earn these bounties, publishers are aggressively pursuing consumers by promising cash incentives and free popular electronic devices such as iPod music players and Xbox 360 game consoles to those who will fill out a credit application or subscribe to a publication or service. These sites have found that consumers are willing to provide personal information as well as refer several friends in order to receive a device worth up to $400.

However, VanBoskirk says that while some marketers do not seem to be concerned with how their publishing partners attract an audience for their subscription or financial service, they may be putting their customer relationships at risk. “You could turn away a loyal customer if you were associated with a bad brand or screwed-up message,” says VanBoskirk, who recommends that marketers retain some control over the incentive process.

Service and subscription companies looking to acquire customers are among the top individual Internet advertisers. According to Nielsen//NetRatings AdRelevance advertising data for November 2005, telephony company Vonage spent more than any other company in online advertising, while LowerMyBills.com, BellSouth Corp., Netflix, Verizon and QuinStreet were also in the top 10.

Interest in bounty programs has spurred the development of specialty performance networks, such as QuinStreet, Adteractive, AzoogleAds and MetaReward, that are focused on customer acquisition and lead generation. These networks are bypassing the largest networks and offer generous bounties to publishers who can funnel traffic to their clients.

“To the extent that you can deliver more quality leads, advertisers are willing to pay for them,” says J.B. Orecchia, president of MetaReward.

Detailing the Demographics

Orecchia says the increasing competition among bounty programs is prompting marketers to collect more extensive demographic and lifestyle information so that they can match consumers with advertisers. MetaReward collects date of birth, gender and address information as part of their registration process. The company, which along with Lower MyBills.com and PriceGrabber.com are subsidiaries of Experian Interactive, analyzes the information and delivers targeted advertisements for its advertising clients.

“Deriving positive return on investment from cost-per-lead/account programs relies on the marketer’s ability to match the consumer profile with the type of customer the advertiser is looking for,” according to Orecchia. “It all comes down to yield management,” he says. “Marketers must identify the characteristics of the programs that maximize the quality of the leads.”

Orecchia says his clients do not want to filter out bad data themselves, so publishers must scrub the lead data at the same time it is being collected. MetaReward relies on technology developed by parent company Experian to verify the authenticity of address information as well as remove duplicate leads in real time so that the consumer experience is not disrupted.

Publishers need to be diligent in filtering consumer data because consumers are being more creative in trying to scam companies out of free goods, according to Greg Morey, executive vice president at marketing consulting firm GR Wyse. “The free iPod generation prompted people to [find new ways] to beat the system.”

Morey says despite improvements in screening submissions, there is “still a high amount of bad data” being submitted to lead-generation sites. He says the additional techniques for weeding out spurious information, including email verification, double opt-in steps and survey questionnaires, are increasing the cost of processing leads. In recent years the cost to publishers of verifying a lead has risen from approximately 50 cents to more than $2.

Data verification companies such as TARGUS info use multiple databases to check the authenticity of information in real time. These databases not only verify that the phone numbers and addresses are valid, but also that they match the names of the person filling out the form, Morey says. After a form is submitted, TARGUS info checks the data and, if it is valid, consumers are sent to a landing page from the advertiser.

Morey says competitive verticals such as travel companies, vitamin supplements and mortgage lenders are willing to pay the additional cost to reduce the number of bogus leads.

Media Get Their Share

Publishers and broadcasters are also receiving bounties by converting audience members into leads. Technology from LiveDeal enables newspapers and radio stations to host classifieds on their websites and receive commissions for leads, according to Steve Harmon, vice president of corporate development at LiveDeal.

Harmon says publishers that are losing revenue from classifieds to companies such as Monster.com and Craigslist can earn between $10 and $30 for a lead on a vehicle, and between $30 and $300 for a real estate lead. LiveDeal partnered with radio and advertising giant Clear Channel Communications to create classified site SFBayAuto.com. ClearChannel promotes the classifieds on its six San Francisco Bay area radio stations, and the media companies receive a bounty when someone clicks on a vehicle listing and then fills out a form with her contact information.

LiveDeal provides all of the technology, including the classified listings, e-commerce and images of the items for sale, according to Harmon. The lead-generation service, which went online in 2005, enables media companies, which already collect extensive demographic information about their audience, to connect their fans with products that are likely to be of interest.

Turning Leads to Clicks

Performance network Kanoodle has developed a program for niche publishers who can earn small bounties by sharing information about their site’s visitors with larger publishers. BrightAds, which became available in December 2005, is a third-party cookie program that uses information collected on a website to generate relevant ads on another, according to Doug Perlson, Kanoodle’s chief operating officer.

For example, a golf blog or enthusiast site will install BrightAds software, which places cookies on consumers’ computers to record their activities while on the site. Should that consumer then go to a Kanoodle partner site such as MSNBC.com to check the weather, the cookie information would be retrieved, and they would be shown a golf-related advertisement.

“Third-party cookies are going to be the lifeblood of publications that offer free content,” Perlson says.

When a consumer clicks on an ad, Kanoodle gives 5 percent of the revenue from the publisher to the referring web- site, according to Perlson. Because BrightAds has no exclusivity requirements and does not conflict with existing advertising programs, publishers can earn additional revenue without having to modify their current relationships, he says. And while getting a sliver of the PPC commission (Perlson says the money comes from Kanoodle’s share, not the publisher’s) may not sound like much, third-party cookies can be delivered to all consumers who don’t actively block them.

This “stealth” referral program leverages the information collected by niche sites with dedicated audiences to deliver ads to general interest sites, according to Perlson, who expects consumers to become more comfortable with third- party cookies as they realize the benefits of being exposed to more targeted ads. To address privacy concerns, Kanoodle deletes the cookie information after a maximum of 30 days, and sometimes in less than a week.

Forrester’s VanBoskirk says that while BrightAds helps larger publishers to optimize the yields from the ad programs by targeting customers, some consumers may be concerned when they realize that behavioral information is being shared among sites. Consumers are gradually learning that visiting sites utilizing cookies can provide a better experience, but the cookie placement has to be made known to consumers. “Responsible publishers will want to explain that they are collecting cookies,” VanBoskirk says.

She also notes that some small publishers may have reservations that participating in third-party cookie programs could help competitors. “The biggest concern is that a third party will be selling data to another advertiser,” she says.

Going Offline

Publishers in industries that are completed by offline transactions have been limited to pay-per-lead programs, but new technology allows bounties also to be paid on a pending-sale basis. Because advertisers control the offline sales process, fraud is a concern for publishers, according to Jackie Bates, Web marketing director for affiliate network LinkConnector.

LinkConnector’s pending-sale technology enables publishers to follow a campaign’s performance by tracking the progress of the consumer-seller activity until it is completed, Bates says. LinkConnector monitors the progress when leads become pending sales, such as vacation packages or jewelry where sales representatives are often needed to close the deal, she adds.

LinkConnector passes a completed call form from the publisher to the seller, which initiates the monitoring process. The network provides publishers with status reports and processes the payments to guarantee that publishers are compensated, according to Bates.

Bates says the technology gives merchants that do not have online shopping carts more flexibility in setting commission structures. LinkConnector “enables more merchants to come into the affiliate marketing game,” Bates says.

Bounty programs are popular with publishers because of the substantially higher commissions offered for capturing new customers. New tools that clean up lead data and collect more extensive demographic information will make them more useful both to advertisers and consumers.

JOHN GARTNER is a freelance writer in Portland, Ore. He is a former editor at Wired News and CMP. His articles regularly appear on Wired.com, AlterNet.org and MIT’s TechnologyReview.com.