Hot Profits

The marketing of adult entertainment is a lot like any other segment of the affiliate industry, except that it is nothing like any other. The business model and best practices are the same, with skills that easily translate to this sector. But the content makes this a world apart. X-rated sites commercialize one of the deepest human drives, one that’s idealized, demonized, desired and feared.

Sexual expression is one of the most contentious cultural issues. And pornography has been condemned in Western culture for most of recorded human history. Those who create, distribute and market it are well aware that they’re working on the fringe.

Why do they do it? Fun and money. To some people, it’s an exciting industry, enjoyed by millions of hard-working, productive and otherwise average adults who choose to view adult entertainment legally and safely from the privacy of their homes. It can be lucrative, too. According to “Online Adult Entertainment Report 2003,” a research report published by Reuters Business Insight, only 1.5 percent of Web sites contain adult-oriented content, but those sites reaped 66 percent of all online content revenues in 2001. The entire adult entertainment industry is estimated to be worth at least $2.5 billion, and perhaps four times that. Getting in on that while working with exciting content seems like a dream come true to some of us.

Different Strokes

Let’s start with how the X-rated sector of the affiliate marketing industry is different. Like it or not, most of the obvious differences are negatives.

First off, adult-oriented affiliates work with material that’s deemed offensive by many of their peers, as well as the general public, so they may find themselves stigmatized. Next, that same material tars them with the brush of the most egregious form of spam. Finally, they’re subject to more regulations than mainstream affiliates, so they’re also more likely to have legal troubles, even if they try to obey the law. The public face of the adult entertainment industry – the bionic babes and overbuilt guys – is quite different from the reality for those who toil behind the scenes. You couldn’t pick adult affiliates out of the crowd at a computer trade show. But the negative stereotype of the pornographer is a powerful cultural image, one that many avoid by trying to stay anonymous.

For example, the head of Booble, a guide to X-rated content that’s also a parody of popular search site Google, has carefully hidden all traces of his identity. He is known only as Bob. Bob says he heads an interactive advertising agency that works with a variety of traditional clients and started the site for fun. While he thinks his advertising clients would laugh at Booble, he isn’t about to bet his agency on it.

“My suspicion is that most of my clients would think it was pretty funny, but I certainly don’t want to test them,” Bob said. “Plus, I have an ex-wife and kids, and I have to respect my private life. That’s why I choose to remain anonymous.” Many affiliates are like Bob, maintaining a firewall that keeps the quotidian world of jobs, family and friends separate from this secret avocation. But they should realize that there’s always the risk of being exposed.

Even other affiliate marketers look down on those in the X-rated line of business. “Most of our clients see the pornographic sites as the scourge of the earth,” said Drew Jackman, business development manager for 10x Marketing, a company that manages pay-per-click campaigns and provides statistics on Web searches – except for the adult industry.

Another issue that every upright affiliate in the business must contend with is X-rated spam. Triple-X spammers have a special place in hell. Their dirty tricks, from innocent-sounding headers to spawning windows that can’t be closed, are a primer on how to give commercial email a bad name. “The tactics that a lot of the porn Web masters use is really unscrupulous. They use search engine spam, they create an inordinate number of popups, they make users frustrated. We try to stay away from them as much as possible,” said Haiko de Poel, CEO and administrator of ABestWeb.com, an affiliate marketing forum. He said that while those who promote the X-rated sites are affiliates, they’re not part of the mainstream – and not of interest to most merchants. In short, he said, “We see them as the scum of the earth.”

Affiliates use tactics to trick users into opening emails because they work. People who might never seek out an X-rated site can be tempted to click on an explicit picture to see more. Unfortunately, this quirk of human nature makes it nearly impossible to stop sneaky spammers. “Particularly in the adult marketplace, you know they’re doing [spam], but no one will own up that they’re doing it,” said Colin Daniels, CEO of Phoenix Group, merchant of a network of X-rated photo galleries. While his company mails a weekly newsletter only to those who have asked to receive it then confirmed the request in a process known as double opt-in, he acknowledged that over-eager affiliates are a big part of the problem. “It seems to be primarily affiliate-based. If you look at codes, buried beneath the HTML, there is affiliate code buried in there.”

While legitimate X-rated merchants like Daniels are as diligent as any others in warning affiliates against spamming, it’s impossible for them to police the thousands of anonymous affiliates that drop in and out of their programs. But spam-happy affiliates run the risk of having their email service shut off or getting blacklisted by ISPs.

Unfortunately, this is the company you’re keeping if you’re an adult entertainment affiliate. You may have a triple-opt-in list, but, unfortunately, in this hot-button segment, the public is a lot less willing to take the time to separate the ethical affiliates from the spammers.

Lawyer Trouble

Booble, the search-for-X site, got itself into legal trouble not for its sizzling content, but for the staid old rap of copyright infringement. Lawyers at search engine Google, a former iconoclastic upstart itself, sent Booble a cease-and-desist letter, claiming Booble is an encroachment on its world-class brand. Did Google pick on Booble because of its content? In their response to Google’s complaint, Booble’s attorneys argued the search company hadn’t objected to other Web sites with similar URLs and graphic design, such as the European search site Elgoog.

There’s a lot more for adult-oriented affiliates to worry about. Those who affiliate with the wrong site can find themselves linked to illegal material or practices, for example, providing X-rated content to minors.

Most X-rated sites use possession of a valid credit card number as the de facto proof of age, said Jake Ludens, spokesperson for affiliate network ARS. Merchants only provide censored content on their premium sites until someone registers – and they need a credit card to do that. “That’s the age verification,” he said. When it comes to members of the ARS network, he admitted that there’s no way to stop all juniors from getting inside the gate. In such cases, he said, the site is responsible. “Age verification is on the affiliate.”

ARS regularly polices its affiliates, checking the sites for illegal material. Because affiliates choose which merchants they want to represent, the attitude of the industry seems to be that it’s up to affiliates to perform equal due diligence on a site before signing up to promote it.

According to Dorn Checkley, director of the Pittsburgh Coalition Against Pornography, studies show that anywhere from 70 to 85 percent of teenagers have been exposed to explicit material on the Web, most of them by accident. Seeing this stuff at an to problems ranging from inappropriate behavior to sexual violence. Unfortunately, Checkley said, the requirement of a credit card to view paid sites does little to keep minors away from content that’s illegal to show them. “Sure, you need a credit card to download or to see more, but you don’t have to pay a dime to see the most explicit stuff out there,” Checkley said.

Sizzling Success

While the challenges for XXX affiliates are many, there are rewards for those who get it right. Here’s where the segment begins to look like the rest of the industry. To succeed, adult-oriented affiliates need to work hard, find a way to rise above the clutter of mediocre sites and provide value to their visitors.

The adult affiliate marketplace has gone through changes in the last few years, according to Phoenix Group’s Daniels. Like the rest of the affiliate industry, it moved from pay-per-click to revenue sharing, typically on a 50/50 basis. The business moved to today’s flat pay-out model, where affiliates receive set payments for referrals that convert to paid memberships. Pay-outs zoomed from $25 or $30 to $50 and up, as merchants competed for affiliates’ referrals. Life was good.

But the big payouts and privileged access to X-rated content flooded the market with low-end affiliate sites. “All the affiliates had little sites with a few pictures and advertisements all over them. There was this huge influx of free [material],” Daniels said. The problem was, merchants want their affiliates to entice visitors just enough so that they’ll click through to the premium site and spend some money there. Too often, he said, after they spend a half hour looking around the affiliate sites, they’ve had enough.

Daniels said that to be successful today, X-rated affiliates should concentrate on building one or two quality sites. “Unless you have some exclusive content, it looks like everything else,” he said. Phoenix Group’s most successful affiliates write reviews and guides. “This is the type of pre-selling that’s almost critical at this point,” he said.

Booble is a prime example of combining useful reviews with unique style. Although it masquerades as a Web search site, in fact, it’s an extremely well-indexed body of original reviews created by a team of volunteers and freelance writers. All the links that show up in searches lead to sites with which Booble is affiliated – about 150 at press time; Bob said that represents about half of all available programs.

Affiliates who show they can produce traffic that converts can often forge special relationships with merchants, Phoenix Group’s Daniels said. They can negotiate for exclusive content to use on their sites, a tactic that further differentiates affiliate sites.

Scratching a Niche

Creating a niche can work as well in the adult industry as in the mainstream world. Sssh.com is a woman-oriented erotica site operated by the Phoenix Group that’s extended the market by catering to the sensibilities of female affiliates. Its program, SpiceCash, uses the same technology as the hard-core merchants, but with a softer front end.

“We made a page specifically for women, so when they sign up they don’t see the hardcore or stronger Web sites. So women feel okay about it,” said editor Angie Dapery. Because of this, Sssh.com gets a different sort of traffic, devoted not only to erotic writing and artsy photography but also things like astrology or psychics.

Many affiliates operate a mix of explicit and mainstream sites. ARS widened its purview from erotica in order to accommodate its multitasking affiliates. Founded in 1996 as the Adult Revenue Service, its acronym now stands for Affiliate Revenue Service. Last year, it relaunched its private network as a full-fledged affiliate network, and began seeking mainstream marketers and retailers to take advantage of its network of some 5,000 affiliates generating a reported 70 million unique visits a month. “We’ve noticed that a lot of our merchants had to turn to other affiliate networks in order to promote mainstream products,” said ARS vice president of customer relations and marketing John Valigorsky. “We figured, why make them go anywhere else? Let’s incorporate the companies that they’re also promoting in their mainstream sites [into our network].”

Just as in the wider world of affiliate marketing, there are a glamorous few affiliates promoting adult entertainment who have hit it big, flashing the cars, the clothes and the rings. Most are hard-working aficionados who haven’t quit their day jobs.

Said Booble’s Bob, “We’d like this little adventure to pay for itself. If we weren’t having to pay lawyers, we might make a little bit. But not enough to pay for a whole other employee.” But hey, it’s not all about the money. XXX affiliates get the thrill of being insiders in an industry that still pushes all kinds of buttons.

SUSAN KUCHINSKAS has covered online marketing and e-commercesince their beginnings for Revenue, Business 2.0, and othermedia. She also has published erotic fiction.

Snake Eyes

Five’ll get you 10 that online gambling is here to stay. Cyber casinos already take wagers from around the globe on everything from five-card stud to the first race at Belmont. Even the industry’s harshest critics concede online gambling revenue has soared tenfold in the past six years to about $4.2 billion.

With generous payout packages and surging demand, it’s no surprise that affiliate sites are jamming the search engines like blue-haired ladies at a Tom Jones concert. Affiliates are anxious to collect their piece of the action, with a few lucky superaffiliates raking in five figures a month.

But it’s an election year in the US, where online casinos are outlawed, and affiliates are feeling a chill wind from lawmakers and federal prosecutors who allege online gaming is linked to ID thefts, personal bankruptcy, money laundering and, you guessed it, even terrorism.

As Revenue went to press, the US Senate was preparing to debate a bill that would ban the use of credit cards, wire transfers or other financial instruments for online gambling. A similar bill sailed through the House of Representatives last year on a 319-104 vote, authorizing five-year prison terms and hefty fines for violators.

“From a family perspective, the home may be considered a castle, but it should never be a casino,” said Rep. James Leach, R-Iowa, who authored an earlier version of the anti-gambling legislation in the House.

The strong rhetoric, combined with aggressive tactics used by federal prosecutors, has frightened many affiliates so much that they are reluctant to discuss their activities on the record out of fear they may be targeted by the government. Other affiliates, however, have become vocal proponents for legalized online gaming in the United States.

“I think there’s a lot of posturing going on right now,” said Cynthia Carley, outspoken owner and manager of the 150- member Gaming Portal Webmasters Association at GPWA.com. “There are a lot of legal attempts to intimidate people, but they don’t have any legal grounds at the moment. And getting those legal grounds is going to be more difficult than they believe it will be.”

To be sure, there are several other challenges in this controversial sector:

  • Some affiliates complain they have trouble collecting commissions from offshore casinos, and they get little sympathy from US authorities.
  • Many longtime affiliates think the sector is simply too crowded, with hundreds of new affiliates joining the throng each day.
  • Longtime stigmas of gambling addictions and organized crime still haunt the industry despite legal gambling in most of the US and lotteries in 39 states.

But it’s the legal issue more than any other that has affiliates on the edge. Cynthia Fanshaw, the 27-year-old marketer featured in our cover story, told Revenue she abandoned the shifting legal sands of gaming five years ago for the relative stability of the adult entertainment industry. “I started having conversations with a few Internet industry attorneys, and nobody could give me a straight answer,” she recalled, saying she feared being declared guilty by association. “By promoting an online casino, you’re getting in bed with them. If you’re promoting them, and they’re not doing business correctly, you’re just as guilty as they are.”

Fanshaw was just one of many affiliates, program managers, casino operators and others who complained that authorities have failed to provide clear guidelines on what is legal and what is not. Revenue repeatedly pursued the question with the US Justice Department, but the clearest response we obtained was from department spokeswoman Casey Stavropoulos, who simply said affiliate marketing of online gaming remains “a gray area.”

Active Enforcement

That, however, hasn’t stopped the Justice Department from going after parties they feel are too far into the gray. In mid-2003, PayPal Inc. and its parent, eBay, agreed to pay $10 million to settle federal allegations it had “aided” in illegal offshore and online gambling by transmitting millions of dollars in funds derived from “criminal offenses.” Prosecutors said the offenses involved the processing of illegal gambling transactions in Missouri, coincidentally the home state of US Attorney General John Ashcroft.

“Offshore sports books and online casino gambling operations which do business in the United States generally do so in violation of federal criminal laws. Therefore, we will continue to investigate and pursue such activity,” said Raymond Gruender, the US Attorney whose office pursued PayPal.

Not surprisingly, PayPal no longer services gambling transactions. Neither does Commission Junction nor BeFree, the two popular affiliate networks recently combined into a single division by ValueClick.

About the same time, the Department of Justice in Washington sent a warning letter to several media organizations regarding “Advertising for Internet Gambling and Offshore Sportsbooks Operations.” The letter was widely circulated, including on the Web site for Interactive Gaming News, where Revenue obtained a copy. It said, in part:

“The sheer volume of advertisements for offshore sports books and online casinos is troubling because it misleads the public in the United States into believing that such gambling is legal when in fact, it is not.”

The letter went on to reiterate that Internet gambling was illegal within the United States “whether or not such operations are based offshore.”

A few months later, the operator of a portal site was subpoenaed to testify before a federal grand jury investigating advertising for online gambling, according to published reports. Several media organizations, including radio giant Clear Channel Communications, also were subpoenaed in connection with the advertising probe.

Revenue asked Jan Diltz, the spokeswoman for Gruender’s office, for confirmation of the reports and clarification of the laws surrounding affiliate marketing, but received only a Kafkaesque series of responses. Diltz said she could not comment on any ongoing investigation until indictments were issued. Asked if that meant there was an ongoing investigation, Diltz said she could not comment. Nor would she comment generally on whether affiliate marketing of online gaming was legal or illegal. Asked how affiliates could know if they were in danger of violating the law prior to being indicted, Diltz said she could not comment.

Unclear on the Concept

Diltz said department regulations prevented her from saying anything else about the matter. Instead, she pointed to the press release that included Gruender’s comments months earlier at the conclusion of the PayPal case, but that said nothing about affiliate marketing. The lack of clear guidelines has left many casinos, program managers and affiliates feeling frustrated.

“With all the subpoenas that were sent out to radio stations, magazines and a lot of different merchants that took online gaming advertising, it’s been more of a threat than anything else,” said Daniel van Dijkman, global affiliate manager for VIPProfits.com, a network with about 3,500 active affiliates serving eight online casinos. About 70 percent of his affiliates operate in the US.

Without clarity on the legal limits, or even on whether the grand jury has completed its probe, Carley said her association’s members were equally divided over how to proceed. “We have people who are ready to jump out there to do battle, and we have people who do everything they can to fly under the radar,” she said. “They don’t want to be seen, they don’t want to be tracked, they don’t want to be known.”

Attorney Larry Walters, who has represented casinos in First Amendment cases, said the power of the US government to regulate advertising is not as extensive as its ability to regulate a service like gambling and therefore affiliates would be somewhat less constrained than the casinos themselves. Casino operators tend to see the enforcement campaign as a tactic to silence affiliates.

“I think a few people in the United States with dogmatic opinions are trying to frighten affiliates and advertisers out of conducting their business in a proper manner,” said David Caruthers, CEO of BetOnSports.com, which operates a 1.2-million-square-foot casino in Costa Rica. The company also has operations in the Dominican Republic, Antigua and South Wales, all of which Caruthers states are “licensed and legal and I would defend that position very, very, very robustly.”

Caruthers hinted the legal climate had worsened under the Bush administration. “I think we’ve seen in recent times … correspondence from the Department of Justice that is very ambiguous and very threatening, with really no substance or legal fallback for their accusations,” he said. “I see that as aggressive, dogmatic and unfair.”

Rep. Bob Goodlatte, R-Va., was among the most ardent supporters of the bill that cleared the House and the bill now pending in the Republican-controlled Senate. When the House bill passed, he hailed it as a step that would help to “close off opportunities for money launderers, terrorists and organized crime.”

“The director of the FBI has testified that Internet gambling remains a loophole in America’s fight against terrorism,” Goodlatte said at the time.

Part of Leach’s bill, HR 21, could be blended with the Senate version in conference committee if the measure progresses through the Senate. “Internet gambling increases consumer debt, makes bankruptcy more likely, money laundering an easy endeavor, and identity theft a likely burden,” Leach said.

Social Costs

Goodlatte also stated that Internet gambling has “contributed to a whole host of social ills.” To be sure, online gaming certainly makes it easier for gambling addicts to place wagers, said Marc Lefkowitz, director of training for the California Council on Problem Gambling. However, he said his group has no opinion on whether gambling is good or bad. Neither does Gamblers Anonymous, the leading counseling group for the 5.4 percent of American adults who are believed to have a gambling addiction.

Lefkowitz said the important thing is that land-based and online casinos adopt a number of responsible gambling practices. “We want them to be able to refer [problem gamblers] to us, to post a help-line number, and perhaps train employees in responsible gambling practices,” said Lefkowitz, who has led numerous training sessions at land-based casinos. “We’re starting to get a good response from some gambling Web sites who are interested in making sure they have the same thing.”

Caruthers, the CEO of BetOnSports.com, said the need to help problem gamblers was among the reasons that he favored regulation and control of the online gaming industry. “Any proper operator worth his salt would have procedures in place to protect the business from being exploited by underage people or people with gaming problems,” he said, pointing to information on his site that advises customers to wager responsibly and to seek help if they need it.

“We are very, very acutely aware and sensitive to running our business with the highest degree of probity,” Caruthers said. “And looking after your customer is No. 1 in this field.”

The Glut

For all the political sound and fury in the US, all sides agree that online gaming is growing faster than anyone expected. Goodlatte estimated online gaming revenues grew from $445 million in 1997 to $4.2 billion in 2003. And Carley, who runs seven gaming portals in addition to GPWA.com, notes there were only 300,000 listings for “video poker” in Google when she launched VideoPokerJunkie.com in December 2000. Today, she said, there are 4 million listings.

Carley warns there is a glut that makes the affiliate business very tough. She said her group has members who are self-supporting and others who’ve been doing it for years but don’t make $1,000 a month.

“I believe we’re in a glut and we have been for the past year,” she said. “I’ve seen people getting out of the business and casinos failing. It’s a tremendously competitive business.”

Adding to this is the risk that an unscrupulous offshore site might just decide not to pay an affiliate. “I have had situations with the larger companies where they refused to pay me,” said Allen Schneider, a former director of the Interactive Gaming Association who now runs the Internet marketing firm RUOnTheNet.com. Schneider claims that he had to fight one Israeli company for eight months to get the $5,000 in commissions. Affiliates recommended that newcomers seek sites that pay commissions based on a portion of what the client deposits at the site. Two other common models offer a share of the client’s losses, which may be small, or a modest bonus for bringing on new clients, a model called cost-per-acquisition or CPA. Carley offers another, simpler piece of advice: “Use common sense.”

All things considered – legal risks, competition, social ills – this might not be the right area for all affiliates. To succeed, affiliates need to find the right niche for themselves, whether that is gambling or, say, baby clothes. There is no right or wrong answer here. However, Marc Lesnick, conference organizer for the Casino Affiliate Convention, argues that throughout history, the people who took the biggest risks got the biggest rewards.

“It’s like the 1920s when you had prohibition,” he said. “The people who took the risk, the rum-runners, got rich. The affiliates are, if you want to say it, breaking the law by enabling gambling. But nevertheless, they’re getting some hefty rewards for it.”

TOM MURPHY is editor in chief of Revenue

Side Effects

Affiliates promoting pharmaceuticals online can earn lifetime commissions and five-figure paychecks while helping consumers purchase the drugs they need for a fraction of what they would pay at the corner drugstore. But the price also can be unacceptably high.

It certainly was for Ryan Haight. Using a debit card his parents gave him to buy baseball cards, the 18-year-old honor student went online and purchased 100 tablets of hydrocodone, the generic version of the painkiller Vicodin. He died after mixing the pills with morphine and other drugs.

“What happened to my son shows that kids today can easily buy drugs online,” said Haight’s mother, Francine. “It’s just like buying candy in a candy store. I was worried about the street drugs like marijuana, cocaine, and the other drugs you hear about, not prescription drugs.”

The tragedy illustrated the enormous risks that cloud one of the fastest-growing and most controversial areas of affiliate marketing. While the vast majority of affiliates and merchants conduct business in a safe and ethical manner, the lack of clear regulations and potential for abuse have resulted in a chaotic marketplace of conflicting laws and even criminal conduct.

Online pharmacies offer rich rewards to affiliate marketers who accept the risks. It’s not uncommon for affiliates to make thousands of dollars a month in commissions, largely through pharmacies located outside the US. The US Food & Drug Administration (FDA) estimates American consumers received 5 million offshore drug shipments in 2003 alone. That was up from 1 million in 2001 and 2 million in 2002.

Industry on the Edge

The bigger the business gets, the more attention it attracts from consumers, affiliates, online drugstores, regulators, prosecutors and others with a stake in the industry. “The business is teetering to the point that it may be gone tomorrow or it may survive,” said Marc Lesnick, who organizes the Conference for Online Pharmaceuticals. “The odds are stacked against the affiliate.”

The FDA has no regulations that specifically address the online sale of pharmaceuticals, although there are many laws related to traditional drug sales that may apply in certain cases. The US Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) does have regulations about online drug sales, but has difficulty enforcing them. Therefore, the responsibility for making sure programs are safe and legal often lies in the hands of each affiliate marketer and director. That’s a lot of responsibility, and potential liability, to be leaving in the hands of the very people who earn revenue by marketing the products.

The problems inherent with self-regulation hit home recently for Brian Johnson, an affiliate marketing manager for MyRxForLess.com. A recent news report aired by Dallas TV station WFAA alleged the Mexico-based pharmacy sold Zoloft that had nearly 20 times the acceptable level of certain heavy metals. When Revenue contacted Johnson, he said he didn’t have enough information to comment. “I’m just an affiliate running a business,” he said. “A lot of people can say a lot of things, but the jury is still out. Besides, what online pharmacy isn’t being investigated by the FDA? Until it’s illegal, I’ll keep doing it.” Indeed, as we went to press, no charges had been filed against either Johnson or the pharmacy.

Numerous other affiliate marketers who were contacted for this story declined to discuss their efforts. Their tendency to shy from publicity is in stark contrast to their colleagues in more traditional industries. Lesnick understands this reluctance to enter the debate in an industry where, essentially, there are no guarantees. “If I was an affiliate, my name would be Billy Joe Bob, and that’s all you get,” he said. “The bottom line is that affiliates may try their best to promote a reputable pharmacy, but they don’t know what these guys are doing.”

Lesnick notes it can be tough to avoid legal problems when they arise. “In pharmaceutical cases, the lawyer names every single person involved, from the hospital to the doctor to the insurance company to the pharmacy to the Web site. There are some affiliates I know who stay away because it is a legal nightmare.”

A New Wave Is Coming

Indeed, this industry has been placed under the microscope, and as proposed new laws and regulations threaten to restrict the market many affiliates have stayed away from this potential moneymaker altogether because of the uncertain future.

“We need regulations because we have seen a significant increase in bad operators, drugs being given without prescriptions, and offshore transportation of drugs, which is illegal,” said Drugstore.com CEO Peter Neupert. “The bottom line is people are looking for low-cost alternatives. They find those lower prices online, but it comes at the price of their safety.”

To promote safety between affiliates and pharmacies, the Internet Pharmacy Board (IPB), a nonprofit association, promotes safe tele-medicine practices in compliance with the national and state boards of pharmacy and medicine, federal agencies, the medical community and patients. “I suggest the IPB to any affiliates or pharmacies that are getting involved in this area of online marketing,” said Aaron Sallade, CIO and affiliate program director for Millennium Pharmaceuticals.

It’s easy to see that other changes are on the way. One is a new program from National Health Services and Millennium Pharmaceuticals that, in theory, will make the affiliate marketing of prescription drugs safer. The program follows a legal and ethical code and screens for drug abuse patterns. If abuse is suspected, those records will be sent to a doctor for review. “We are creating a health care network rather than a pill store,” Sallade said. “It’s a program that we feel will be fully supported by the FDA and DEA.”

Affiliate marketers can also be more selective in the drugs they promote. Millennium is among the companies that make a good profit without selling controlled drugs. Sallade said his top affiliate averages 300 orders a day. With an average commission of $30, that earns the affiliate $270,000 a month. The average affiliate earners complete five orders daily, for about $4,000 per month, he said.

Other companies have reported similar results. “We have paid out over $100,000 per month to our top performers and have numerous affiliates that earn five-figure commission checks each month,” Steve Yasher, affiliate director of Medical Web Services LLC, said in an email interview. About 90 percent of the company’s revenue comes from affiliates.

Commissions paid to affiliates depend on the program, and there are two popular types. One provides lifestyle drugs such as Viagra, Propecia or diet pills. The other provides maintenance medications such as blood pressure, birth control or antidepressant medications.

Lifestyle medication programs pay out an average of $40 to $50 per order. These programs often offer a hybrid payout model, which is a flat rate per each sale plus a percentage of the sale. Lifestyle programs are popular not only because of the higher payout, but also because they give affiliate marketers more control, allowing them to set their own price. Maintenance medication programs typically pay a commission of about 10 percent – comparable to many other areas of affiliate marketing.

From a business perspective, who wouldn’t be attracted to lifetime commissions? And getting into the business is not difficult. Some programs will provide you with a pre-made template to give you a jump-start. No degree or medical experience is required. Like other affiliate programs, you just need patience, Internet marketing knowledge, dedication and creativity.

“The biggest downfall of new affiliates is that they feel that they can quickly make good money with little effort or maintenance,” Yasher said. “Internet marketing and the online prescription industry are both evolving very rapidly, and if you do not stay on top of your marketing strategies, you can very quickly waste your money on ineffective campaigns in a very competitive marketplace.”

Under the Microscope

You may be asking yourself, if buying pharmaceuticals online is so risky, why do so many people do it? The answer is simple. It’s convenient, private and, most importantly, relatively inexpensive.

“As long as the astronomical costs of pharmaceuticals remain in [the US], we will always be the better alternative, providing the cheaper, authentic product, with fast reliable and professional service,” said Laura Hunt, affiliate director of US-based Impact Health Care.

David Gross, senior policy adviser for AARP’s Public Policy Institute, said his group tells members to do their homework before attempting to buy prescription drugs, whether online or otherwise. “If someone is going to buy offshore, which we don’t recommend, they need to make sure they’re getting a pharmacy that is licensed, that is accredited,” Gross said.

“The bottom-line is people are looking for low-cost alternatives. They find those lower prices online, but it comes at the price of their safety,” said Neupert of Drugstore.com.

No Doctor in the House

Another risk lies in the fact that people who order prescription drugs online often are not required to consult a physician in person or, even worse, at all. The DEA has a problem with that. According to the agency’s guidelines regarding dispensing and purchasing controlled substances over the Internet, “It is illegal to receive a prescription for a controlled substance without the establishment of a legitimate doctor-patient relationship, and it is unlikely for such a relationship to be formed through Internet correspondence alone.”

Ryan Haight bought his drugs from Main Street Pharmacy, a Norman, Okla. company that exemplifies what authorities call “rogue” pharmacies. The only requirement to order his lethal dose of drugs was the completion of a medical history statement, which then is reviewed by a doctor who consults for the online pharmacy.

Daniel Guess, an assistant US attorney in Dallas, successfully prosecuted 33-year-old Clayton Fuchs, owner of Main Street Pharmacy, on six felony counts that carried penalties of up to 20 years in prison. “Online pharmacies that tell a patient they ‘don’t need a prescription’ should be a red flag to consumers,” Guess said.

“When you think of a drug dealer, you think of a person standing on a corner selling marijuana or cocaine,” the prosecutor said. “These guys online selling pill after pill after pill are really no different. But they are perceived differently. There are no differences between the online pharmacy and the typical cocaine or marijuana dealer.

“We’ll start looking at them that way.”

Rogue pharmacies make most of their money by pushing highly addictive medications like hydrocodone or dangerous diet drugs over the Internet. Trouble is, diagnosing or confirming a medical condition is complicated and cannot be accurately done without a physical exam.

“The biggest risk ordering prescription drugs from an online source is that since you aren’t seeing a doctor, you are essentially diagnosing yourself and just choosing what medication you need,”said Dr. Vince Iannelli, professor of pediatrics at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School. “Figuring out a medical problem is much more complicated than that since many conditions have similar symptoms. And an evaluation is never complete without a physical exam, which isn’t possible when ordering prescriptions online. Simply filling out a generic form isn’t enough.”

Haight’s story proves that. And the publicity it has generated has inspired self-regulation in high places. Internet search engines Google, Yahoo and Microsoft have all barred advertising from unlicensed pharmacies. Others, like pay-per-click search engine Overture, have amended contracts and policies to address the issue of online pharmacies.

What can affiliates do to make sure they’re promoting safe and legal companies? “I would ask the affiliate program to provide me with the DEA registration for their pharmacy and doctors, and I would request a copy of their professional license,” Sallade said. “If an online pharmacy states that they are certified, the question to ask is, ‘Where did the certification come from and what were the requirements for that certification?'”

The bottom line is that, at least for now, caution is the order of the day. Says Yasher: “I would advise all affiliates to engage the services of legal counsel to review their business practice.”

LAURA SCHNEIDER is the marketing editor for About.com. Her articles on marketing have been published by more than 4,000 Web sites and magazines. She is also partnership development and marketing manager for Revenue Partners, where she has developed and managed online marketing ventures for a decade.

Been There Done That: Q & A with Shawn Collins

It’s very difficult to find anyone in affiliate marketing better known than Shawn Collins, who earned his first commissions more than seven years ago.

Wearing his newest hat, as president/CEO of Shawn Collins Consulting, he provides outsourced affiliate program management. But he is, perhaps, better known as a co-founder of Affiliate Summit, as the author of the top-selling book Successful Affiliate Marketing for Merchants and for launching the highly successful affiliate program for ClubMom, a membership shopping site.

As a result of his numerous roles, Collins has not only become ubiquitous, but has helped to shape the industry through its childhood. He’s emerged as an expert for spotting new trends. Indeed, Revenue Editor-in-Chief Tom Murphy discovered some surprises when he interviewed Collins about where affiliate marketing is headed.

TOM MURPHY: You’re very well known in the industry as a superaffiliate, a guru, an association leader, a leader of an industry summit and, most recently, as a program consultant. How do you really define yourself these days?

SHAWN COLLINS: I guess I’ve been on every angle of the industry, working as an affiliate and affiliate manager. I worked with First Directory Preferred years ago. I guess, overall, I’d probably characterize myself as a cheerleader of the industry as well as a shepherd trying to push it in a direction that I think will be helpful for the industry.

TM: Do you think there’s a chance of spreading yourself too thin?

SC: I don’t think so, but my wife thinks I spread myself too thin a long time ago.

TM: You recently published your AffStat survey, which had some very interesting statistics in it. I’d recommend it to anyone who wants to know what’s going on in affiliate marketing. I had heard, for example, from a number of sources, that only about 5 percent of affiliates make any real money and only about 2 percent fall into the superaffiliate category. But your AffStat report shows 20 percent of affiliates making more than $2,000 a month. Do you think that’s an accurate figure?

SC: Yes. I had a pretty good cross-section here who were participating in the survey, from the very small mom-and-pops to some of the really big players. And I know who contributed the answers, so I think it’s a very accurate depiction.

One of the things that skews the numbers when they talk about 5 percent or 2 percent is that, in the past, there was a very big emphasis on quantity over quality of affiliates. And people are very proud to claim they had 75,000 or 100,000 affiliates. But naturally, you’re not going to have 15 percent of those being too powerful. These days, you see a lot more of a boutique approach to it, where people have 1,000 or 5,000 affiliates, so it’s much more realistic to have a good 20 percent or more be superaffiliates.

TM: I’d like to hear your thoughts on a few of the issues facing affiliates, including PPC, predatory advertising, Froogle and things like that. But, first, do you think these things taken together are really just symptoms of an evolving industry?

SC: Yeah, I really think they’re inevitable. It’s a more sophisticated industry than it was back in the ’90s. I think they’re good things. They’re hurting some of the smaller affiliates, but they’re making things easier for the affiliate managers because they’re shrinking the number of affiliates they have to deal with.

TM: It sounds almost like a natural, evolutionary process where there’s a survival of the fittest. Do you think that’s what is taking place?

SC: Absolutely. Back in 2000, and earlier than that, you really didn’t see any superaffiliates out there. You had SchoolPop and some others, but there’s been a big emergence of these sites over the past couple of years – various sites that have a tremendous amount of traffic, with membership sites and things. They’ve really taken a big bite out of the industry. They account for a big portion of the activity that goes on.

TM: Predatory advertising seems to be perceived as public enemy No. 1 in the community. Do you see that as a problem that’s getting better or worse going forward?

SC: I think it’s been limited to a degree over the last year or so, but it’s still a very relevant issue and I think it will be around for a while. Certainly, some of the affiliate managers have taken a cue from the networks. I think the affiliate managers have to be more proactive in their approach to stopping it instead of just sort of waiting for something to happen.

It is sort of a double-edged sword because a lot of the affiliate managers on a moralistic level would like to get rid of predatory advertisers. But when they have pressure from their bosses on the bottom line, they end up having to take those (predatory) affiliates because they’re seeing higher numbers with them. It puts them between a rock and a hard place. They want to do the right thing, but they want to keep their job[s].

TM: There’s a similar thing with spam. Nobody likes it. It hurts the image of the community. It hurts the consumers. And, arguably, it hurts the merchants and manufacturers, who spend a lot of time building up brand names. Do you think that’s also a double-edged sword for the merchants?

SC: With the parasites, there are some good adware products. But I think with spam, there’s never a good spammer. I think that has really hurt the industry tremendously because it’s resulted in the CAN-SPAM Act and that changed the face of affiliate marketing in one fell swoop this year.

TM: You wrote about the CAN-SPAM Act recently in a brief and in your blog. Could you reiterate your key points?

SC: Basically, a lot of the CAN-SPAM [requirements] are logical things, like you have to have an unsubscribe option and take care of things that any permission mailer always takes care of. But one of the things that makes it very difficult for affiliate marketing is the need to have a suppression list. If I’m an affiliate and I usually feature four different merchants in my newsletters, I’m now going to have to crush my entire subscriber list against their list of unsubscribes who never want to hear from them again. That makes it awfully challenging, not only to get that technology and make it work, but it throws some hurdles in front of affiliates who run email promotions.

TM: Some affiliates are feeling deeply threatened by Froogle, Google’s spider-driven shopping service. What kind of impact do you see from that in the affiliate area?

SC: Just from the power of Google, I think it’s certainly going to have a greater and greater impact on the smaller affiliates. A lot of the merchants like it because it gives them more exposure, the same as Shopping.com or Yahoo’s comparison-shopping engine. I think it’s a very positive thing in terms of affiliate programs getting more exposure and more penetration, but it’s definitely one of the things leading to a smaller world of affiliates out there.

TM: From what you said, it sounds like the number of people making some real money is on the rise, but the overall number of affiliates is declining. Is that right?

SC: Yes. Through a sort of natural selection, I guess. Since people used to take all comers, you’d get tons of sites from Geocities, and the free sites on AOL, and different free hosting services. So a lot of affiliates would be made up of free services where they never even bothered to put a link up. I wouldn’t even characterize them as affiliates because they didn’t know how to put a link up.

TM: I saw you referred to a lot of affiliates as “dead affiliates” in your report, people who haven’t provided a click in the last month or so. What sort of proportion do you think that is of the total number of affiliates out there?

SC: For the larger programs that haven’t done any sort of maintenance to clean out people who’ve been inactive for a while, they probably fall into that 95-5 rule (where only 5 percent of affiliates are making money). But (for) people who’ve tried to communicate often with the inactive affiliates, and sweep them out if they haven’t been active, it’s a much different percentage. But I think 80 percent of the programs probably have the 95-5 rule going on.

TM: That’s a pretty high proportion. And it’s contrary to a lot of other things we’re seeing going on with big business today. Most businesses in the last two years or so since the recession have been trying hard to maximize their efficiencies. And it seems like the affiliate program may be one of those areas that’s been overlooked. At the same time, I see affiliate programs contributing a bigger proportion of top-line growth to corporations these days. What’s your advice to corporations in general?

SC: It makes all the sense in the world to shrink the number of affiliates to just those affiliates who are going to be performing and who show some promise. But affiliates who have emails that bounce back and haven’t shown an impression in six months, I don’t think it’s worth carrying them on the affiliate roles. One of the reasons you see this perpetuating is that it’s all performance-driven. So even though they may be taking up some bandwidth, they’re really not costing anything for the companies that are keeping them on. But it makes more sense to me to shrink the size of the affiliate program so you know who’s promoting you and how they’re doing it, and you have a relationship with them.

TM: How do you think pay per click is changing the world for affiliates?

SC: In the last couple of years, there were a whole lot of affiliates basically using PPC – not even having their own Web sites. It was quite a successful tactic. I did it myself for quite a while, just driving activity right to the merchant. But in the last six months, a lot of merchants have been clamping down and adding a lot of restrictions because they found they’ve been bidding against their own affiliates and paying more than they have to. They’ve been concerned that a lot of searches normally would have ended at their site anyway. When an affiliate buys the keywords for a trademarked name, it’s a waste of money for the merchants because it would have been organic traffic for them.

TM: Do you think that’s an issue that will go away on its own because merchants will put a stop to it?

SC: I think what a lot of them are doing is damming the ability to bid on trademark names. Then they’re selecting certain generic keywords and saying, if you want to be in our program you can only bid a certain amount for these terms. And if you don’t like it, you just can’t do any pay-per-click promotions with us. Eventually, it will just sort of fade out and the affiliates will still do it successfully because there are a ton of words you can use without having to infringe on their trademarks. So I think that will be a strong channel for affiliates for a long time to come.

TM: Another interesting statistic in the AffStat report – I’m combining a couple of categories here – says 40 percent of affiliates have negotiated higher payments from programs. Does that fit with your anecdotal experience? And does that present a headache for affiliate managers?

SC: I was actually surprised by that figure myself. I’ve found, in personal experience, even for some smaller sites of mine, if I approach affiliate managers and tell them what I think I can do for them, a lot of them are willing to negotiate and make a special deal for you. So I think it’s really possible for just about any affiliate to do that. A lot of them never ask because they don’t realize it’s a possibility. But I don’t think the average affiliate manager would mind being asked, because then they know it’s an engaged affiliate and they can get more activity out of them.

TM: As a consultant, would you recommend to affiliate managers that they keep the door open to negotiations with affiliates? Or is there a time constraint that may limit their activities and put a lot of pressure on them?

SC: It’s something you’d have to model for. You just can’t put out projections for a year expecting to pay the rate you advertise on your site – say, a 7 percent commission. If you do that, you’re going to end up blowing out your budget. Because if you say you’re going to pay a 7 percent commission for everybody and you give 10 percent to superaffiliates, you might spend twice as much as you expected on commissions. If you don’t model for that, you’re going to be in trouble.

TM: How do you see the future for networks versus in-house programs? Do you see a bigger share for networks, or a bigger share for in-house programs?

SC: The networks still have the bulk of the activity in the space. When I did the AffStat report at the end of 2002, I think the networks had about 80 percent of the market share. But I think we’ll see an expanding role for in-house programs such as My Affiliate Program and DirectTrak. They’re getting more and more of the network programs to switch over, and they’re very aggressively recruiting new clients. I think in the next couple of years, we’ll see more prevalence of that kind of program.

TM: What do you think that means to the affiliates out there?

SC: It makes things a little more challenging to them in some ways if they have to go to a lot of different places to log onto their stats. But, otherwise, it’s a good thing for affiliates because it’s a little cheaper to run in-house programs so, theoretically, the affiliate programs can pay more to the affiliates in commission.

TM: The merger between Commission Junction and ValueClick is now a done deal. Nobody is sure what will happen to CJ in the future. What do you think is the future for big networks? And do you think this merger and other trends in networking open more opportunities for niche networks?

SC: It’s exciting to see this happen. It sort of validates the way the industry is moving, that it definitely has a future. It’s sort of surprising to some people that it took this long for there to be some consolidation because there have been rumors about various companies getting together for years and years. But it definitely sets the stage for some niche players out there who can take care of certain types of clients, with certain levels of start-up fees, because right now the bigger networks are not really an available resource for some of the mom-and-pops who are out there. It leaves an open door for ShareASale and MyAffiliate programs to capitalize on anyone who’s not in the Fortune 500.

TM: There are always new technologies coming down the pike, and I think we can all agree that’s a good thing. There wouldn’t be affiliate programs now if there hadn’t been technologies in the past few years that make it possible. Some technologies, such as the Norton firewall product introduced recently, block banners and can make links unclickable. Are there ways the affiliate community can change things when a company introduces a product that creates obstacles to what they do to make their living?

SC: I think the individual affiliates are powerless. We really have to rely on the networks banding together and going to Norton or whoever might make a similar product. One of the prime targets of these products are the domains that are serving all the banners and the clickable URLs for affiliate programs. The products are going after the URLs for LinkShare and Commission Junction and other companies, so it’s certainly in their best interest to get their hands dirty and try to take care of this as soon as possible. (See ReveNews.)

TM: Do you know if they’re doing that?

SC: I don’t know. I know in the past that was going on. Then, the end-user was asked if they wanted to block ads, and now it’s a default that I’ve just heard about. I don’t know how active the networks are. I would imagine they’re out there trying to find some sort of resolution for it.

TM: What will be coming up at your summit this year?

SC: The plan for the whole agenda is to be very focused on networking. We’ll certainly have our share of speakers and panels. But for every conference I’ve gone to during the last decade, it seems like the feedback from the people is always that they wished there was more networking, and nobody seems to be catching on to that. Every time you go to a conference you see the same cast of characters up there on a panel and running some PowerPoint, and it seems like it’s boring everybody. But the organizers aren’t seeing that. So my partners, Missy Ward and Ryan Phelan, and I figured we’d create a conference for people who hate conferences. We’ll have an emphasis on the things people love: the formal and informal networking as well as the educational sessions. And so we’re sort of expanding beyond what the past affiliate marketing conferences have been to make it more of a performance-marketing conference for affiliates.We’re also bringing in the experts on email and search to all get together for a four-day event. I don’t know if you ever heard of speed-dating, where people date for 30 seconds and then move on. We’ve sort of adapted that goofy concept to speed-networking, where you sit opposite another person for 30 seconds and give them your card and have these mini-meetings. You get a lot more comfortable and have a lot more interaction on a level that you can’t really see. (Note: For more information about the upcoming summit, please visit AffiliateSummit.com.)

TOM MURPHY, editor in chief of Revenue, has been writing about business and technology for more than 25 years. He is also the author of Web Rules: How the Internet is Changing the Way Consumers Make Choices.

Bad Guerrillas

The biggest mistake of all is launching an affiliate marketing program without knowing perception from reality.

THE PERCEPTION is that you’ve been running your affiliate program earnestly and professionally. That’s why you have lots of affiliates. You don’t feel you’ve got to be very aggressive with your marketing because all the affiliates already know about you.

THE REALITY is that very few of your own affiliates know about your business. Even if you’ve been in the same business for five years, if you assume your affiliates know what you sell and why it’s terrific, you’re making a major misjudgment.

THE PERCEPTION is that you can’t treat your affiliates any better than you do right now. Each one of them is happy and delighted with the rewards of their service. You don’t have to improve your affiliate program.

THE REALITY is that your affiliate base represents a teeny tiny percentage of the potential market. Treat them like royalty but start to focus upon those affiliates who are proving to be above the rest. Zero-in on finding more just like them. Need I tell you that all affiliates aren’t created equal?

THE PERCEPTION is that all of your business is repeat business and that you’re doing everything right. Your focus is 100 percent on your existing affiliates.

THE REALITY is that if you’re not growing, you’re on the way to going out of business. No business can rely solely on its existing affiliates.

THE PERCEPTION is that you get a great deal of your business strictly by the energy and resourcefulness of your affiliates, so you don’t have to invest in real marketing.

THE REALITY is that when you invest in affiliate support materials in all shapes and forms, then provide them to your best affiliates, you’ll realize that those tools are some of the best marketing investments you’ll ever make – and you really don’t have to invest much money.

As a marketing phenomenon, Internet affiliate marketing is one of the new kids on the block. Whenever marketers flock to a new marketing medium, they seem to repeat the same mistakes.

A big mistake made with Internet affiliate programs is failing to consistently market the program and the products to the affiliates. These are not ordinary people. These are the extraordinary ones who made a conscious decision to participate in your program. Somehow, you conveyed a vision to them, and they saw themselves in that beautiful picture. You showed them how to be an important part of it. They paid rapt attention. They signed up to carry your banner forward into the fray.

And suddenly a monster of a mistake was made. Nothing happened.

You told your story once but once was not, is not, never is enough. Your affiliates have to see that vision again and again to incorporate it into their essence. Unless you consistently stay in touch with them – email, telephone, online chats, snail mail, regional meetings – they are not going to be the evangelists that the best of them can be with the proper care and feeding.

Of all the people who sign up for your program, only a very few will be true Rolls Royce affiliates. Your biggest job is to learn who they are, then treat them the way deities deserve to be treated. Forget the 80/20 rule. In Internet affiliate marketing, you need to remember instead the 95/5 rule. You’ll get 95 percent of your program profits through the efforts of only 5 percent of your affiliates.

It’s a mistake of the highest order to treat all your affiliates the same. Guerrillas are very adept at playing favorites. Your affiliate marketing program has a better chance of coming through for you if you understand what affiliate marketing really is and also exactly what it is not.

Guerrillas know that affiliate marketing is just a fancy phrase for helping people earn money by selling your offering, then treating those people exceptionally well.

It is more common sense and patience than anything else. But too many people make the boneheaded mistake of thinking that affiliate marketing is also a bunch of things it isn’t, such as:

  1. Affiliate marketing is not email. Some companies think they can get all the affiliate support they need with email. A microscopic number of those companies are right. Most businesses need a plethora of other marketing weapons in order for their email campaigns to succeed. If you are doing email only, you’re no guerrilla.
  2. Affiliate marketing is not telemarketing. For business-to-business marketing, few weapons succeed as well as telemarketing. And telemarketing response rates can be improved by augmenting it with advertising, yes, advertising, and email, even snail mail. But marketing is not just telemarketing.
  3. Affiliate marketing is not having a Web site. Sure, you’ve got to have a Web site to provide information, answer questions, reassure, take prospects to the next level and deepen the relationship between their lives and your company. But you must remember that a Web site only helps with the job. It does not do the job. Not hardly.
  4. Affiliate marketing is not producing brochures. Many companies rush to produce a brochure about the benefits they offer, then pat themselves on the back for the quality in the brochure. Is that brochure marketing? It is a very important part when mixed with 10 or 15 other very important parts – but all by itself? Forget it.
  5. Affiliate marketing is not show business. There’s no business like show business, and that includes marketing. Think of affiliate marketing as help-to-sell business, create-a-desire business, inspire-a-vision business, expand-a-company business, generate-motivation business. But don’t think of yourself as being in the entertainment business because affiliate marketing is not supposed to entertain your customers.
  6. Affiliate marketing is not an invitation to be clever. If you fall into the cleverness trap it’s because, unlike the guerrilla, you don’t realize that people remember the most clever part of the marketing even though it’s your enticing offer they should remember. Cleverness is a marketing vampire, sucking attention away from your primary offer.
  7. Affiliate marketing is not complicated. It becomes complicated for people who fail to grasp the pure simplicity of marketing, but affiliate marketing is user-friendly to guerrillas. They begin with a seven-sentence guerrilla affiliate marketing plan, create a marketing calendar and select from 100 weapons, over half of them free. Not too complicated. The full list appears online at www.GuerrillaMarketingAssociation.com.
  8. Affiliate marketing is not a miracle worker. More money has been wasted due to marketers expecting miracles than to any other misconception of marketing. Affiliate marketing can be the best investment you’ll ever make – if you do it right, and doing it right requires knowledge, commitment, patience and planning.

Value Proposition

With the many affiliate offerings out there, why would anyone want to align himself or herself under your banner? The answer is: your value proposition. You must structure your referral fees with a fair percentage to make it worth their while. It should be generous to make them sense that they are, indeed, earning a passive income.

And it must be simple to make their lives easy. You must offer them the tools of today’s technology: auto-responders, hyperlinks, team-building techniques, incentive programs, contests, sweepstakes, and training materials.

Affiliate marketing is an opportunity so new and unlike what your daddy did that it intimidates many business owners, who then steer clear of it. For guerrillas, affiliate marketing is a ticket to ride first class, avoiding the potholes, on the road toward financial well-being.

But even as you avoid the potholes, you’ll still see affiliate road kill littering the landscape. That’s because it’s so easy to make a mistake with a new concept such as Internet affiliate marketing. Our pioneers made their share as they settled our nation. Why should it be any different among pioneers in marketing? Mistakes are part of the deal, but if you know them ahead of time, perhaps you can sit out that hand.

As all affiliates are not equal, neither are all stupid affiliate marketing mistakes. Stupid mistakes in horrid abundance have been made by otherwise bright companies when testing the affiliate marketing waters. Because guerrillas can learn from these blunders, it’s worth your time to know the most notable:

  • Failure to attract attention during the announcement of a program dooms many brilliant affiliate efforts before they have a chance to shine. Opening lines, email subject lines and first impressions are the gates to your offer. Open them wide.
  • Not facing the reality of an affiliate marketing explosion relegates your attempt to the ordinary, which means the ignored. Guerrillas say things to rise above the din, to be noticed and desired in a sea of affiliate marketers. If you were the only game in town that would be a different story, but there are many games. Act and market accordingly.
  • Focusing your message on yourself instead of your affiliate will usually send your effort to oblivion. Affiliates do not think of themselves as affiliates. They think of themselves as people, husbands, wives, brothers, parents, sports fans, business owners, professionals, consultants. They care far more about themselves than they care about you. So talk to them about themselves ” and help them to see themselves as affiliates. Expect magic if you can do this.
  • Not knowing precisely who your market is will send your affiliates off in the wrong direction. Research into pinpointing that market will be some of the most valuable time you devote to your affiliate marketing campaign. Those hard-working affiliates of yours need all the help they can get. Guerrillas are helpers supreme.
  • Marketing to other than honest prospects wastes your affiliates’ time. If you make your offer to people who don’t really have a need for your offering, it will be an incredibly tough sale. As in all direct marketing – and make no mistake, affiliate marketing is direct marketing – the target market is the most important factor, followed by the offer and then by the way that offer is presented.
  • Initiating affiliate marketing programs without specific objectives gives you too hazy a target for bull’s-eyes. Begin by setting the goals you wish to attain, then the steps you’ll take to reach those goals – and the benchmarks you’ll use to measure your progress. Without benchmarks, you’ll be affiliate marketing in the dark.
  • Featuring the benefits of your product or service to your affiliates first is telling them what they don’t want to know yet. First, your job is to make them see how they can gain financially. Then, they’ll pay rapt attention to the vehicle that will convey them to that promised land. To a hungry man, the most important benefit is the promise of a good meal. To a business, it’s profits. To an affiliate, it’s financial independence.
  • Failing to test all that can be tested is a goof-off of the highest order. Test your commission structure, price points, benefits to stress, contact times and mailing lists to know the real winners. Test various marketing weapons with your affiliates so you can provide them with the most lethal. Guerrillas test everything they can, constantly subjecting the results to the litmus test of profits.

There. Now you can never say that you weren’t warned. You can never plead ignorance when you commit a monumental boo-boo. On the other hand, perhaps you can take a deep breath of relaxation knowing that others have made the really moronic errors for you and that there are no more to be made.

Guerrillas giggle at that idea. When it comes to Internet affiliate marketing, as new as it is, they operate according to a single mantra: “Don’t make the same mistake once.”

JAY CONRAD LEVINSON is the author of the Guerrilla Marketing series of books, the most popular marketing series in history with 14 million sold in 39 languages. He also publishes the Web site GuerrillaMarketingAssociation.com.