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Global Sourcing: Insights and Opportunities From China and Beyond

September 12, 2005

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Sourcing goods globally – developing strategies, capabilities and formal processes for acquiring materials from the most effective use of resources regardless of location – is not a new, or even revolutionary, practice. Many companies have been doing it for years. Recently, however, there have been large increases in: 1) the number of companies seeking to […]

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Ventana Research

September 12, 2005

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Ventana Research is the preeminent research and advisory services firm in the Business Performance Management market. With the unique research framework covering both the technology and business aspects of performance management, Ventana Research helps decision-makers throughout the organization understand each other’s requirements, align goals and objectives and optimize business processes with existing and new technology […]

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Delivering Merger Synergy: A Supply Chain Perspective

September 12, 2005

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After a quiet period of several years, merger and acquisition activity has gained momentum across many industry sectors in 2005. The interest in M&A activity never, of course, disappeared – and with good reason. Accenture research shows that high-performance businesses pursue growth strategies that juggle the short-term priorities of today and the organizational and competitive […]

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Architecting the Liquid Supply Chain

September 12, 2005

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A common supply chain misconception equates “liquids” with “process industries.” A huge opportunity for discrete and service industries lies in recognizing the quantity of liquids that flow through these industries and exploiting the operational, financial and strategic benefits that liquid-oriented logistics offers. Since supply chain networks for liquid products are fundamentally different from those for […]

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Aligning Supply Chain Management With Utility Operations

September 12, 2005

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The 21st century has been tough on public utilities. A look at the Dow Jones Utility Average – with an average return of negative 20 percent over the last four years – demonstrates how many utilities have struggled. Some of those woes reflect a sluggish economy and investors’ view that public utilities are a slow-growth […]

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Elusive Integration: Linking Sales and Operations Planning

September 12, 2005

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Mapping customer delivery requirements against the realities of supply chain capability is often an endless source of friction. Demand forecasts are constantly changing, customer needs are ever more specific, and service requirements are rising in every industry. Growing overseas sourcing makes seasonal fluctuations tougher and places greater stress on intra- and inter-organizational communications. Supply chain integration has long promised to smooth the wrinkles between sales and operations planning.

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Real Results From Purchase-to-Pay Opportunities

September 12, 2005

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The Challenge Is Not One of Vision, But of Execution Executive leadership understands and awaits the substantial savings promised from internal change initiatives to control and manage indirect spend, but most continue to wait. Why? Although those primarily responsible – chief procurement officers – recognize the proverbial pearl in the oyster of procurement, they have […]

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Interview: Harvard University Professor Clayton Christensen

September 12, 2005

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ASCET: You use the term “disruptive technologies” in your work. Can you define this term and talk about how the concept can be applied to supply chain? Clayton M. Christensen (CC): A disruption is an innovation that comes into a market that enables a whole new population of people who historically might not have had […]

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Electronics Manufacturing Transformation

September 12, 2005

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In the last century, vertical manufacturing strategies were still the rule for manufacturers of high-technology electronics. In 1990, the global market was worth nearly $100 billion, while less than 5 percent of all manufacturing was outsourced. A tremendous surge in manufacturing outsourcing began in the mid-1990s and continued into the 2000s. During this time, a […]

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